Definitions

Abnormal Course Condition

Any of these four defined conditions:

Advice

Any verbal comment or action (such as showing what club was just used to make a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball.) that is intended to influence a player in:

But adviceAdvice: Any verbal comment or action (such as showing what club was just used to make a stroke) that is intended to influence a player in: does not include public information, such as:

Animal

Any living member of the animal kingdom (other than humans), including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates (such as worms, insects, spiders and crustaceans).

Animal Hole

Any hole dug in the ground by an animalAnimal: Any living member of the animal kingdom (other than humans), including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates (such as worms, insects, spiders and crustaceans)., except for holes dug by animalsAnimal: Any living member of the animal kingdom (other than humans), including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates (such as worms, insects, spiders and crustaceans). that are also defined as loose impedimentsLoose Impediment: Any unattached natural object such as: (such as worms or insects).

The term animal holeAnimal Hole: Any hole dug in the ground by an animal, except for holes dug by animals that are also defined as loose impediments (such as worms or insects). includes:

Areas of the Course

The five defined areas that make up the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee::

Ball-Marker

An artificial object when used to markMark: To show the spot where a ball is at rest by either: the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball-markerBall-Marker: An artificial object when used to mark the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball-marker or another small piece of equipment. or another small piece of equipmentEquipment: Anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or the player’s caddie..

When a Rule refers to a ball-markerBall-Marker: An artificial object when used to mark the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball-marker or another small piece of equipment. being moved, this means a ball-markerBall-Marker: An artificial object when used to mark the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball-marker or another small piece of equipment. in place on the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: to markMark: To show the spot where a ball is at rest by either: the spot of a ball that has been lifted and not yet replacedReplace: To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in play..

Boundary Object

Artificial objects defining or showing out of boundsOut of Bounds: All areas outside the boundary edge of the course as defined by the Committee. All areas inside that edge are in bounds., such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed.

This includes any base and post of a boundary fence, but does not include:

Boundary objectsBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed. are treated as immovable even if they are movable or any part of them is movable (see Rule 8.1a).

Boundary objectsBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed. are not obstructionsObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. or integral objectsIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed..

Bunker

A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed.

These are not part of a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed.:

BunkersBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed. are one of the five defined areas of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course:.

A CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may define a prepared area of sand as part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing. (which means it is not a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed.) or may define a non-prepared area of sand as a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed..

When a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed. is being repaired and the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. defines the entire bunker as ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both:, it is treated as part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing. (which means it is not a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed.).

The word “sand” as used in this Definition and Rule 12 includes any material similar to sand that is used as bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed. material (such as crushed shells), as well as any soil that is mixed in with the sand.

Caddie

Someone who helps a player during a roundCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways:, including in these ways:

A caddieCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways: may also help the player in other ways allowed by the Rules (see Rule 10.3b).

Club-Length

The length of the longest club of the 14 (or fewer) clubs the player has during the roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee. (as allowed by Rule 4.1b(1)), other than a putter.

For example, if the longest club (other than a putter) a player has during a roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee. is a 43-inch (109.22 cm) driver, a club-lengthClub-Length: The length of the longest club of the 14 (or fewer) clubs the player has during the round (as allowed by Rule 4.1b(1)), other than a putter. is 43 inches for that player for that roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee..

Club-lengthsClub-Length: The length of the longest club of the 14 (or fewer) clubs the player has during the round (as allowed by Rule 4.1b(1)), other than a putter. are used in defining the player’s teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. on each hole and in determining the size of the player’s relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors: when taking relief under a Rule.

[Clarification Available →]

Committee

The person or group in charge of the competition or the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee:.

See Committee Procedures, Section 1  (explaining the role of the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course.).

Conditions Affecting the Stroke

The lieLie: The spot on which a ball is at rest and any growing or attached natural object, immovable obstruction, integral object, or boundary object touching the ball or right next to it. of the player’s ball at rest, the area of intended stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke., the area of intended swing, the line of playLine of Play: The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a stroke, including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line. and the relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors: where the player will dropDrop: To hold the ball and let go of it so that it falls through the air, with the intent for the ball to be in play. or place a ball.

Course

The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course.:

The courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: is made up of the five defined areas of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course:.

Drop

To hold the ball and let go of it so that it falls through the air, with the intent for the ball to be in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:.

If the player lets go of a ball without intending it to be in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:, the ball has not been droppedDrop: To hold the ball and let go of it so that it falls through the air, with the intent for the ball to be in play. and is not in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: (see Rule 14.4).

Each relief Rule identifies a specific relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors: where the ball must be droppedDrop: To hold the ball and let go of it so that it falls through the air, with the intent for the ball to be in play. and come to rest.

In taking relief, the player must let go of the ball from a location at knee height so that the ball:

Embedded

When a player’s ball is in its own pitch-mark made as a result of the player’s previous strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. and where part of the ball is below the level of the ground.

A ball does not necessarily have to touch soil to be embeddedEmbedded: When a player’s ball is in its own pitch-mark made as a result of the player’s previous stroke and where part of the ball is below the level of the ground. (for example, grass and loose impedimentsLoose Impediment: Any unattached natural object such as: may be between the ball and the soil).

Equipment

Anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or the player’s caddieCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways:.

Objects used for the care of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee:, such as rakes, are equipmentEquipment: Anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or the player’s caddie. only while they are being held or carried by the player or caddieCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways:.

Equipment Rules

The specifications and other regulations for clubs, balls and other equipmentEquipment: Anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or the player’s caddie. that players are allowed to use during a roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee.. The Equipment RulesEquipment Rules: The specifications and other regulations for clubs, balls and other equipment that players are allowed to use during a round. The Equipment Rules are found at usga.org.  are found at usga.org. 

Flagstick

A movable pole provided by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. that is placed in the holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played: to show players where the holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played: is. The flagstickFlagstick: A movable pole provided by the Committee that is placed in the hole to show players where the hole is. The flagstick includes the flag and any other material or objects attached to the pole. includes the flag and any other material or objects attached to the pole.

The requirements for a flagstickFlagstick: A movable pole provided by the Committee that is placed in the hole to show players where the hole is. The flagstick includes the flag and any other material or objects attached to the pole. are stated in the Equipment RulesEquipment Rules: The specifications and other regulations for clubs, balls and other equipment that players are allowed to use during a round. The Equipment Rules are found at usga.org. .

Four-Ball

A form of play where sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. compete, with each player playing his or her own ball. A side’sSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. score for a hole is the lower score of the two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. on that hole.

Four-BallFour-Ball: A form of play where sides of two partners compete, with each player playing his or her own ball. A side’s score for a hole is the lower score of the two partners on that hole. may be played as a match-playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: competition between one sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. and another sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. or a stroke-playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. competition among multiple sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play..

Foursomes (also known as “Alternate Shot”)

A form of play where two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. compete as a sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. by playing one ball in alternating order on each hole.

FoursomesFoursomes (also known as “Alternate Shot”): A form of play where two partners compete as a side by playing one ball in alternating order on each hole. may be played as a match-playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: competition between one sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. and another sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. or a stroke-playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. competition among multiple sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play..

General Area

The area of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course: that covers all of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: except for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areasPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there., (3) all bunkersBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed., and (4) the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: of the hole the player is playing.

The general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing. includes:

General Penalty

Loss of hole in match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: or two penalty strokes in stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition..

Ground Under Repair

Any part of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. defines to be ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: includes both:

Ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: also includes the following things, even if the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. does not define them as such:

The edge of ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: should be defined by stakes, lines or physical features:

When the edge of ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: is defined by lines or physical features, stakes may be used to show where the ground under repairGround Under Repair: Any part of the course the Committee defines to be ground under repair (whether by marking it or otherwise). Any defined ground under repair includes both: is, but they have no other meaning.

Hole

The finishing point on the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: for the hole being played:

The word “hole” (when not used as a Definition in italics) is used throughout the Rules to mean the part of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: associated with a particular teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing., putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: and holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played:. Play of a hole begins from the teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. and ends when the ball is holedHoled: When a ball is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green. on the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: (or when the Rules otherwise say the hole is completed).

Holed

When a ball is at rest in the holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played: after a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that:.

When the Rules refer to “holing outHoled: When a ball is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green. ” or “hole outHoled: When a ball is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green.,” it means when the player’s ball is holedHoled: When a ball is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green..

For the special case of a ball resting against the flagstickFlagstick: A movable pole provided by the Committee that is placed in the hole to show players where the hole is. The flagstick includes the flag and any other material or objects attached to the pole. in the holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played:, see Rule 13.2c (ball is treated as holedHoled: When a ball is at rest in the hole after a stroke and the entire ball is below the surface of the putting green. if any part of the ball is below the surface of the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that:).

Honour

The right of a player to play first from the teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. (see Rule 6.4).

Immovable Obstruction

Any obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. that:

The CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may define any obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. to be an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that:, even if it meets the definition of movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course..

Improve

To alter one or more of the conditions affecting the strokeConditions Affecting the Stroke: The lie of the player’s ball at rest, the area of intended stance, the area of intended swing, the line of play and the relief area where the player will drop or place a ball. or other physical conditions affecting play so that a player gains a potential advantage for a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball..

In Play

The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: and is being used in the play of a hole:

A ball that is not in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: is a wrong ballWrong Ball: Any ball other than the player’s:.

The player cannot have more than one ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: at any time. (See Rule 6.3d for the limited cases when a player may play more than one ball at the same time on a hole.)

When the Rules refer to a ball at rest or in motion, this means a ball that is in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:.

When a ball-markerBall-Marker: An artificial object when used to mark the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball-marker or another small piece of equipment. is in place to markMark: To show the spot where a ball is at rest by either: the spot of a ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole::

Integral Object

An artificial object defined by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. as part of the challenge of playing the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: from which free relief is not allowed.

Integral objectsIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. are treated as immovable (see Rule 8.1a). But if part of an integral objectIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. (such as a gate or door or part of an attached cable) meets the definition of movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course., that part is treated as a movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course..

Artificial objects defined by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. as integral objectsIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. are not obstructionsObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. or boundary objectsBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed..

Known or Virtually Certain

The standard for deciding what happened to a player’s ball – for example, whether the ball came to rest in a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there., whether it movedMoved: When a ball at rest has left its original spot and come to rest on any other spot, and this can be seen by the naked eye (whether or not anyone actually sees it do so). or what caused it to moveMoved: When a ball at rest has left its original spot and come to rest on any other spot, and this can be seen by the naked eye (whether or not anyone actually sees it do so)..

Known or virtually certainKnown or Virtually Certain: The standard for deciding what happened to a player’s ball – for example, whether the ball came to rest in a penalty area, whether it moved or what caused it to move. means more than just possible or probable. It means that either:

“All reasonably available information” includes all information the player knows and all other information he or she can get with reasonable effort and without unreasonable delay.

Lie

The spot on which a ball is at rest and any growing or attached natural object, immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that:, integral objectIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed., or boundary objectBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed. touching the ball or right next to it.

Loose impedimentsLoose Impediment: Any unattached natural object such as: and movable obstructionsMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course. are not part of the lieLie: The spot on which a ball is at rest and any growing or attached natural object, immovable obstruction, integral object, or boundary object touching the ball or right next to it. of a ball.

Line of Play

The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball., including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line.

The line of playLine of Play: The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a stroke, including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line. is not necessarily a straight line between two points (for example, it may be a curved line based on where the player intends the ball to go).

Loose Impediment

Any unattached natural object such as:

Such natural objects are not loose if they are:

Special cases:

Lost

The status of a ball that is not found in three minutes after the player or his or her caddieCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways: (or the player’s partnerPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. or partner’sPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. caddieCaddie: Someone who helps a player during a round, including in these ways:) begins to search for it.

If the search begins and is then temporarily interrupted for a good reason (such as when the player stops searching when play is suspended or needs to stand aside to wait for another player to play) or when the player has mistakenly identified a wrong ballWrong Ball: Any ball other than the player’s::

Mark

To show the spot where a ball is at rest by either:

This is done to show the spot where the ball must be replacedReplace: To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in play. after it is lifted.

Marker

In stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition., the person responsible for entering a player’s score on the player’s scorecardScorecard: The document where a player’s score for each hole is entered in stroke play. and for certifying that scorecardScorecard: The document where a player’s score for each hole is entered in stroke play.. The markerMarker: In stroke play, the person responsible for entering a player’s score on the player’s scorecard and for certifying that scorecard. The marker may be another player, but not a partner. may be another player, but not a partnerPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play..

The CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may identify who will be the player’s markerMarker: In stroke play, the person responsible for entering a player’s score on the player’s scorecard and for certifying that scorecard. The marker may be another player, but not a partner. or tell the players how they may choose a markerMarker: In stroke play, the person responsible for entering a player’s score on the player’s scorecard and for certifying that scorecard. The marker may be another player, but not a partner..

Match Play

A form of play where a player or sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. plays directly against an opponentOpponent: The person a player competes against in a match. The term opponent applies only in match play. or opposing sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. in a head-to-head match of one or more roundsRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee.:

Match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: can be played as a singles match (where one player plays directly against one opponentOpponent: The person a player competes against in a match. The term opponent applies only in match play.), a Three-BallThree-Ball: A form of match play where: match or a FoursomesFoursomes (also known as “Alternate Shot”): A form of play where two partners compete as a side by playing one ball in alternating order on each hole. or Four-BallFour-Ball: A form of play where sides of two partners compete, with each player playing his or her own ball. A side’s score for a hole is the lower score of the two partners on that hole. match between sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of two partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play..

Maximum Score

A form of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. where a player’s or side’sSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. score for a hole is capped at a maximum number of strokes (including strokesStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. made and any penalty strokes) set by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course., such as two times par, a fixed number or net double bogey.

Movable Obstruction

An obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. or the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee:.

If part of an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that: or integral objectIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. (such as a gate or door or part of an attached cable) meets these two standards, that part is treated as a movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course..

But this does not apply if the movable part of an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that: or integral objectIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. is not meant to be moved (such as a loose stone that is part of a stone wall).

Even when an obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. is movable, the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may define it to be an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that:.

Moved

When a ball at rest has left its original spot and come to rest on any other spot, and this can be seen by the naked eye (whether or not anyone actually sees it do so).

This applies whether the ball has gone up, down or horizontally in any direction away from its original spot.

If the ball only wobbles (sometimes referred to as oscillating) and stays on or returns to its original spot, the ball has not movedMoved: When a ball at rest has left its original spot and come to rest on any other spot, and this can be seen by the naked eye (whether or not anyone actually sees it do so)..

Natural Forces

The effects of nature such as wind, water or when something happens for no apparent reason because of the effects of gravity.

Nearest Point of Complete Relief

The reference point for taking free relief from an abnormal course conditionAbnormal Course Condition: Any of these four defined conditions: (Rule 16.1), dangerous animalAnimal: Any living member of the animal kingdom (other than humans), including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates (such as worms, insects, spiders and crustaceans). condition (Rule 16.2), wrong greenWrong Green: Any green on the course other than the putting green for the hole the player is playing. Wrong greens include: (Rule 13.1f) or no play zoneNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area. (Rules 16.1f and 17.1e), or in taking relief under certain Local Rules.

It is the estimated point where the ball would lie that is:

Estimating this reference point requires the player to identify the choice of club, stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke., swing and line of playLine of Play: The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a stroke, including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line. he or she would have used for that strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball..

The player does not need to simulate that strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. by taking an actual stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke. and swinging with the chosen club (but it is recommended that the player normally do this to help in making an accurate estimate).

The nearest point of complete reliefNearest Point of Complete Relief: The reference point for taking free relief from an abnormal course condition (Rule 16.1), dangerous animal condition (Rule 16.2), wrong green (Rule 13.1f) or no play zone (Rules 16.1f and 17.1e), or in taking relief under certain Local Rules. relates solely to the particular condition from which relief is being taken and may be in a location where there is interference by something else:

No Play Zone

A part of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: where the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. has prohibited play. A no play zoneNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area. must be defined as part of either an abnormal course conditionAbnormal Course Condition: Any of these four defined conditions: or a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there..

The CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may use no play zonesNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area. for any reason, such as:

The CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. should define the edge of a no play zoneNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area. with a line or stakes, and the line or stakes (or the tops of those stakes) should identify the no play zoneNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area. as different than a regular abnormal course conditionAbnormal Course Condition: Any of these four defined conditions: or penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. that does not contain a no play zoneNo Play Zone: A part of the course where the Committee has prohibited play. A no play zone must be defined as part of either an abnormal course condition or a penalty area..

Obstruction

Any artificial object except for integral objectsIntegral Object: An artificial object defined by the Committee as part of the challenge of playing the course from which free relief is not allowed. and boundary objectsBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed..

Examples of obstructionsObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects.:

An obstructionObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. is either a movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course. or an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that:. If part of an immovable obstructionImmovable Obstruction: Any obstruction that: (such as a gate or door or part of an attached cable) meets the definition of movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course., that part is treated as a movable obstructionMovable Obstruction: An obstruction that can be moved with reasonable effort and without damaging the obstruction or the course..

See Committee Procedures, Section 8; Model Local Rule F-23  (CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may adopt a Local Rule defining certain obstructionsObstruction: Any artificial object except for integral objects and boundary objects. as temporary immovable obstructions for which special relief procedures apply).

Opponent

The person a player competes against in a match. The term opponentOpponent: The person a player competes against in a match. The term opponent applies only in match play. applies only in match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds:.

Outside Influence

Any of these people or things that can affect what happens to a player’s ball or equipmentEquipment: Anything used, worn, held or carried by the player or the player’s caddie. or to the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee::

Out of Bounds

All areas outside the boundary edge of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: as defined by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course.. All areas inside that edge are in bounds.

The boundary edge of the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: extends both up above the ground and down below the ground:

The boundary edge should be defined by boundary objectsBoundary Object: Artificial objects defining or showing out of bounds, such as walls, fences, stakes and railings, from which free relief is not allowed. or lines:

Boundary stakes or lines should be white.

Par/Bogey

A form of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. that uses scoring as in match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: where:

Partner

A player who competes together with another player as a sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play., in either match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: or stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition..

Penalty Area

An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there.

A penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. is:

A penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. is one of the five defined areas of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course:.

There are two different types of penalty areasPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there., distinguished by the colour used to mark them:

If the colour of a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. has not been marked or indicated by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course., it is treated as a red penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there..

The edge of a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. extends both up above the ground and down below the ground:

The edge of a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. should be defined by stakes, lines or physical features:

When the edge of a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. is defined by lines or by physical features, stakes may be used to show where the penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. is, but they have no other meaning.

When the edge of a body of water is not defined by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course., the edge of that penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there. is defined by its natural boundaries (that is, where the ground slopes down to form the depression that can hold the water).

If an open watercourse usually does not contain water (such as a drainage ditch or run-off area that is dry except during a rainy season), the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may define that area as part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing. (which means it is not a penalty areaPenalty Area: An area from which relief with a one-stroke penalty is allowed if the player’s ball comes to rest there.).

Point of Maximum Available Relief

The reference point for taking free relief from an abnormal course conditionAbnormal Course Condition: Any of these four defined conditions: in a bunkerBunker: A specially prepared area of sand, which is often a hollow from which turf or soil was removed. (Rule 16.1c) or on the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: (Rule 16.1d) when there is no nearest point of complete reliefNearest Point of Complete Relief: The reference point for taking free relief from an abnormal course condition (Rule 16.1), dangerous animal condition (Rule 16.2), wrong green (Rule 13.1f) or no play zone (Rules 16.1f and 17.1e), or in taking relief under certain Local Rules..

It is the estimated point where the ball would lie that is:

Estimating this reference point requires the player to identify the choice of club, stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke., swing and line of playLine of Play: The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a stroke, including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line. the player would have used for that strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball..

The player does not need to simulate that strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. by taking an actual stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke. and swinging with the chosen club (but it is recommended that the player normally do this to help in making an accurate estimate).

The point of maximum available reliefPoint of Maximum Available Relief: The reference point for taking free relief from an abnormal course condition in a bunker (Rule 16.1c) or on the putting green (Rule 16.1d) when there is no nearest point of complete relief. is found by comparing the relative amount of interference with the lieLie: The spot on which a ball is at rest and any growing or attached natural object, immovable obstruction, integral object, or boundary object touching the ball or right next to it. of the ball and the player’s area of intended stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke. and swing and, on the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: only, the line of playLine of Play: The line where the player intends his or her ball to go after a stroke, including the area on that line that is a reasonable distance up above the ground and on either side of that line.. For example, when taking relief from temporary waterTemporary Water: Any temporary accumulation of water on the surface of the ground (such as puddles from rain or irrigation or an overflow from a body of water) that::

Provisional Ball

Another ball played in case the ball just played by the player may be:

A provisional ballProvisional Ball: Another ball played in case the ball just played by the player may be: is not the player’s ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:, unless it becomes the ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: under Rule 18.3c.

Putting Green

The area on the hole the player is playing that:

The putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: for a hole contains the holeHole: The finishing point on the putting green for the hole being played: into which the player tries to play a ball.

The putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: is one of the five defined areas of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course:. The putting greens for all other holes (which the player is not playing at the time) are wrong greensWrong Green: Any green on the course other than the putting green for the hole the player is playing. Wrong greens include: and part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing..

The edge of a putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: is defined by where it can be seen that the specially prepared area starts (such as where the grass has been distinctly cut to show the edge), unless the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. defines the edge in a different way (such as by using a line or dots).

If a double green is used for two different holes:

Referee

An official named by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. to decide questions of fact and apply the Rules.

See Committee Procedures, Section 6C  (explaining the responsibilities and authority of a refereeReferee: An official named by the Committee to decide questions of fact and apply the Rules.).

Relief Area

The area where a player must dropDrop: To hold the ball and let go of it so that it falls through the air, with the intent for the ball to be in play. a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors: whose size and location are based on these three factors:

In using club-lengthsClub-Length: The length of the longest club of the 14 (or fewer) clubs the player has during the round (as allowed by Rule 4.1b(1)), other than a putter. to determine the size of a relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors:, the player may measure directly across a ditch, hole or similar thing, and directly across or through an object (such as a tree, fence, wall, tunnel, drain or sprinkler head), but is not allowed to measure through ground that naturally slopes up and down.

[Clarification Available →]

See Committee Procedures, Section 2I  (CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. may choose to allow or require the player to use a dropping zone as a relief areaRelief Area: The area where a player must drop a ball when taking relief under a Rule. Each relief Rule requires the player to use a specific relief area whose size and location are based on these three factors: when taking certain relief).

Replace

To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:.

If the player sets a ball down without intending it to be in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:, the ball has not been replacedReplace: To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in play. and is not in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: (see Rule 14.4).

Whenever a Rule requires a ball to be replacedReplace: To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in play., the Rule involved identifies a specific spot where the ball must be replacedReplace: To place a ball by setting it down and letting it go, with the intent for it to be in play..

Round

18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course..

Scorecard

The document where a player’s score for each hole is entered in stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition..

The scorecardScorecard: The document where a player’s score for each hole is entered in stroke play. may be in any paper or electronic form approved by the CommitteeCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. that allows:

A scorecardScorecard: The document where a player’s score for each hole is entered in stroke play. is not required in match playCommittee: The person or group in charge of the competition or the course. but may be used by the players to help keep the match score.

Serious Breach

In stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition., when playing from a wrong placeWrong Place: Any place on the course other than where the player is required or allowed to play his or her ball under the Rules. could give the player a significant advantage compared to the strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. to be made from the right place.

In making this comparison to decide if there was a serious breachSerious Breach: In stroke play, when playing from a wrong place could give the player a significant advantage compared to the stroke to be made from the right place., the factors to be taken into account include:

The concept of a serious breachSerious Breach: In stroke play, when playing from a wrong place could give the player a significant advantage compared to the stroke to be made from the right place. does not apply in match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds:, because a player loses the hole if he or she plays from a wrong placeWrong Place: Any place on the course other than where the player is required or allowed to play his or her ball under the Rules..

Side

Two or more partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. competing as a single unit in a roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee. in match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: or stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition..

Each set of partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. is a sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play., whether each partnerPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. plays his or her own ball (Four-BallFour-Ball: A form of play where sides of two partners compete, with each player playing his or her own ball. A side’s score for a hole is the lower score of the two partners on that hole.) or the partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. play one ball (FoursomesFoursomes (also known as “Alternate Shot”): A form of play where two partners compete as a side by playing one ball in alternating order on each hole.).

A sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. is not the same as a team. In a team competition, each team consists of players competing as individuals or as sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play..

Stableford

A form of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. where:

Stance

The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball..

Stroke

The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball.

But a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. has not been made if the player:

When the Rules refer to “playing a ball,” it means the same as making a strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball..

The player’s score for a hole or a roundRound: 18 or fewer holes played in the order set by the Committee. is described as a number of “strokes” or “strokes taken”, which means both all strokesStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. made and any penalty strokes (see Rule 3.1c).

Stroke and Distance

The procedure and penalty when a player takes relief under Rules 17, 18 or 19 by playing a ball from where the previous strokeStroke: The forward movement of the club made to strike the ball. was made (see Rule 14.6).

The term stroke and distanceStroke and Distance: The procedure and penalty when a player takes relief under Rules 17, 18 or 19 by playing a ball from where the previous stroke was made (see Rule 14.6). means that the player both:

Stroke Play

A form of play where a player or sideSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. competes against all other players or sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. in the competition.

In the regular form of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. (see Rule 3.3):

Other forms of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. with different scoring methods are StablefordStableford: A form of stroke play where:, Maximum ScoreMaximum Score: A form of stroke play where a player’s or side’s score for a hole is capped at a maximum number of strokes (including strokes made and any penalty strokes) set by the Committee, such as two times par, a fixed number or net double bogey. and Par/BogeyPar/Bogey: A form of stroke play that uses scoring as in match play where: (see Rule 21).

All forms of stroke playStroke Play: A form of play where a player or side competes against all other players or sides in the competition. can be played either in individual competitions (each player competing on his or her own) or in competitions involving sidesSide: Two or more partners competing as a single unit in a round in match play or stroke play. of partnersPartner: A player who competes together with another player as a side, in either match play or stroke play. (FoursomesFoursomes (also known as “Alternate Shot”): A form of play where two partners compete as a side by playing one ball in alternating order on each hole. or Four-BallFour-Ball: A form of play where sides of two partners compete, with each player playing his or her own ball. A side’s score for a hole is the lower score of the two partners on that hole.).

Substitute

To change the ball the player is using to play a hole by having another ball become the ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole:.

The player has substitutedSubstitute: To change the ball the player is using to play a hole by having another ball become the ball in play. another ball when he or she puts that ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: in any way (see Rule 14.4) instead of the player’s original ball, whether the original ball was:

A substitutedSubstitute: To change the ball the player is using to play a hole by having another ball become the ball in play. ball is the player’s ball in playIn Play: The status of a player’s ball when it lies on the course and is being used in the play of a hole: even if:

Tee

An object used to raise a ball above the ground to play it from the teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing.. It must be no longer than 4 inches (101.6 mm) and conform with the Equipment RulesEquipment Rules: The specifications and other regulations for clubs, balls and other equipment that players are allowed to use during a round. The Equipment Rules are found at usga.org. .

Teeing Area

The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing.

The teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. is a rectangle that is two club-lengthsClub-Length: The length of the longest club of the 14 (or fewer) clubs the player has during the round (as allowed by Rule 4.1b(1)), other than a putter. deep where:

The teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. is one of the five defined areas of the courseAreas of the Course: The five defined areas that make up the course:.

All other teeing locations on the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: (whether on the same hole or any other hole) are part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing..

Temporary Water

Any temporary accumulation of water on the surface of the ground (such as puddles from rain or irrigation or an overflow from a body of water) that:

It is not enough for the ground to be merely wet, muddy or soft or for the water to be momentarily visible as the player steps on the ground; an accumulation of water must remain present either before or after the stanceStance: The position of a player’s feet and body in preparing for and making a stroke. is taken.

Special cases:

Three-Ball

A form of match playMatch Play: A form of play where a player or side plays directly against an opponent or opposing side in a head-to-head match of one or more rounds: where:

Wrong Ball

Any ball other than the player’s:

Examples of a wrong ballWrong Ball: Any ball other than the player’s: are:

Wrong Green

Any green on the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: other than the putting greenPutting Green: The area on the hole the player is playing that: for the hole the player is playing. Wrong greensWrong Green: Any green on the course other than the putting green for the hole the player is playing. Wrong greens include: include:

Wrong greensWrong Green: Any green on the course other than the putting green for the hole the player is playing. Wrong greens include: are part of the general areaGeneral Area: The area of the course that covers all of the courseexcept for the other four defined areas: (1) the teeing area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing, (2) all penalty areas, (3) all bunkers, and (4) the putting green of the hole the player is playing..

Wrong Place

Any place on the courseCourse: The entire area of play within the edge of any boundaries set by the Committee: other than where the player is required or allowed to play his or her ball under the Rules.

Examples of playing from a wrong placeWrong Place: Any place on the course other than where the player is required or allowed to play his or her ball under the Rules. are:

Playing a ball from outside the teeing areaTeeing Area: The area the player must play from in starting the hole he or she is playing. in starting play of a hole or in trying to correct that mistake is not playing from a wrong placeWrong Place: Any place on the course other than where the player is required or allowed to play his or her ball under the Rules. (see Rule 6.1b).