Presented by ROLEX           Rules and Decisions

Browse the 2012-2015 Rules

THREE-BALL, BEST-BALL AND FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: GENERAL

30/1

Caddie Shared by Members of Opposite Sides in Four-Ball Match Moves Ball

Q.A and B were playing C and D in a four-ball match. A caddie shared by A and C moves A's ball. What is the ruling?

A.If the caddie was not acting upon directions of C or D, A is penalized one stroke – see Definition of "Caddie" and Rule 18-2a.

If the caddie was acting upon directions of C or D, C is penalized one stroke under Rule 18-3b.

Related Decision:

6-4/1 Meaning of "Specific Directions" in definition of "Caddie."

30/2

Caddie Shared by Opponents' Side in Four-Ball Match Moves Player's Ball

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. A caddie shared by C and D accidentally moves A's ball. Who is penalized?

A.Rule 18-3b provides that, if a player's ball is moved by an opponent's caddie, that opponent incurs a penalty stroke. However, when opponents share a caddie, there is no fair way of assigning the penalty to one member of the side. Accordingly, in equity (Rule 1-4), both C and D incur a penalty stroke.

A must replace his ball – Rule 18-3b.

30/2.5

Player Touches Putting Green in Pointing Out Line for Putting for Partner and Touches Own Line of Putt

Q.In a four-ball match, A and B are partners and their balls lie on the putting green. A touches the green in pointing out B's line for putting. The spot which A touches is also on his (A's) line of putt. What is the ruling?

A.B is disqualified for the hole under Rule 8-2b.

A is disqualified for the hole under Rule 16-1a because he touched his line of putt; the fact that it was in the act of pointing out a line for putting for his partner is irrelevant. (Revised)

30/3 (Reserved)

30/4

Player Who Walks Off Green Under Mistaken Impression Partner Halved Hole Returns and Putts for Half

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. At one hole C and D hole out and their better-ball score is 4. A, who had marked the position of his ball and lifted it, has a putt for a 4 but he mistakenly thinks B has scored a 4. Accordingly, A walks off the green, leaving his ball-marker on the green. B immediately advises A that he (B) scored a 5. So A returns to the green, replaces his ball and holes out for a 4.

C and D claim the hole on the ground that A cannot come back and putt after walking off the green, thinking his partner had halved the hole. Are C and D correct?

A.No. Since A had not waived his turn to putt and there was no undue delay, A was entitled to proceed as he did. If, however, A had not left his ball-marker on the green, and therefore the position of his ball was no longer marked, he would have incurred a penalty stroke under Rule 20-1 and would no longer have had a putt for the half.

Related Decisions:

30-3b/2 Waiving Turn to Putt in Four-Ball Match.

30-3c/2 Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball and Partner Picks Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole.

30/5

In Four-Ball Match Player with Putt for Half Picks Up in Error at Suggestion of Opponent Based on Misunderstanding

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. A has holed out in 4, the better ball for his side. When C holes out, A remarks: "Nice 4, C. D, you may pick your ball up." C does not correct A by stating he had a 5 and allows his partner D to pick his ball up although D still has a putt for a half.

Upon leaving the putting green, it occurs to C that he has allowed D to pick up when D had an opportunity to halve the hole. In the circumstances, could A's remark be construed as a concession of D's putt?

A.No. A's suggestion that D might pick up D's ball was based on A's mistaken impression that C had scored a 4 and that therefore D's putt could have no bearing on the result.

C should have corrected A's mistaken impression before D picked up his ball. Since C failed to do so and D did not finish the hole, C's score of 5 for the hole was C-D's better-ball score. Thus, C and D lost the hole.

Related Decisions:

2-4/4 Whether Picking Up Opponent's Ball Is Concession of Next Stroke.

2-4/5 Whether Lifting Opponent's Ball-Marker Is Concession of Next Stroke.

2-4/17 Player in Erroneous Belief Match Is Over Shakes Opponent's Hand and Picks Up Opponent's Ball.

30/6

Player Plays Practice Putt After He and Partner Have Holed Out But Before Opponents Hole Out

Q.In a four-ball match, A plays a practice putt after he and his partner have holed out but before the opponents have holed out. Was A in breach of Rule 7-2?

A.No. Rule 7-2 prohibits practicing during play of a hole. A did not practice during play of the hole because he and his partner had completed it. However, A was guilty of a breach of etiquette.

Related Decision:

7-2/1 When Practice Between Holes Permitted.

30-1/1

Side Plays Out of Turn from Tee; Opponents Require One Member of Side to Replay But Not Other

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. At one hole A and B drive out of turn. C and D require that A abandon his ball and replay in correct order and that B continue with his original ball. A and B maintain that if A is required to drive again then B must also do so. What is the ruling?

A.Rule 10-1c states in part: "... the opponent may immediately require the player to cancel the stroke so made ... ." In this context, "immediately" means before anyone else plays.

Accordingly, if A and B played in that order, C and D could not require A to replay his stroke after B had played, but they could require B to replay.

If A and B played in the order B-A, A could be required to replay, but not B.

Other Decisions related to Rule 30: See "Four-Ball Match Play" and "Three-Ball Match Play" in the Index.

THREE-BALL MATCH PLAY

30-2/1

Player Plays Out of Turn from Tee in Three-Ball Match

The following are the rulings in a three-ball match if A, B and C are scheduled to play in that order from the teeing ground and one of them inadvertently plays out of turn:

(a) If C plays first both A and B may require C to replay the stroke in correct order. If A and B disagree on whether C should be required to replay, C must complete the hole with two balls. He must replay his stroke in his match with the opponent who requires him to replay and continue with his original ball in his match with the other opponent.

(b) If B plays first, A may require him to replay his stroke for their match, but C may not. As B did not play out of turn with respect to C, B must continue play of his original ball in his match with C. If B is required by A to replay his stroke, B must play the hole with a different ball in his match with A.

(c) If C plays after A but before B, only B may require C to replay his stroke for their match. As C did not play out of turn with respect to A, C must continue play of his original ball in his match with A. If C is required by B to replay his stroke, C must play the hole with a different ball in his match with B.

FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY; GENERAL

30-3/1

Examples of Rulings in Four-Ball Match with Concurrent Singles Matches

When players are involved in concurrent matches, whenever possible the Rules are applied only to the match affected. When it is not possible to separate the matches, the four-ball match takes precedence.

A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. There are also concurrent singles matches between A and C and between B and D. The following are examples of the application of the Rules in such a format:

(1) A concedes the match, a hole, or a stroke to C but stipulates that the concession is solely for their singles match. The concession is not valid in the four-ball match.

(2) A concedes the match, a hole, or a stroke to C and does not specify which match the concession is intended for. The concession applies to both the four-ball and the singles matches.

(3) A concedes the match, a hole, or a stroke to D. The concession applies only to the four-ball match as A has no authority to make a concession in the B-D singles match.

(4) The balls of all four players lie on the putting green and A's ball is the farthest from the hole with B's ball on the same line. Side C-D concedes B's next stroke for the four-ball match only, but B goes ahead and putts before A. In the four-ball match, A is disqualified for the hole (see Decision 2-4/6).

(5) B moves A's ball without authority under the Rules. In the four-ball match, A incurs a penalty stroke (Rule 18-2a) but, in his singles match against C, he incurs no penalty. B incurs no penalty in any match.

(6) Other than during search, A moves D's ball. In the four-ball match, A incurs a penalty stroke (Rule 18-3b) but, in his singles match against C, he incurs no penalty.

(7) On the 3rd hole it is discovered that B started his round with 15 clubs. In the four-ball match, Side A-B has two holes deducted from the state of the match (Rules 4-4a and 30-3d) after the 3rd hole. B has two holes deducted from the state of his singles match against D. A incurs no penalty in his singles match against C.

(8) During the round, B made a stroke with a non-conforming club. In the four-ball match, Side A-B is disqualified (Rules 4-1 and 30-3e). B is disqualified in his singles match against D. A incurs no penalty in his singles match against C.

(9) On the 5th hole, B holes out in 3 to win the hole for Side A-B in the four-ball match. A has a putt left to win or halve the hole in his singles match against C and asks B for advice. There is no penalty to either player. A and B may exchange advice at any time until the four-ball match has been concluded, at which point A and B are no longer partners and become outside agencies with respect to each other.

30-3/2

Effect of State of Match Penalties in Four-Ball Play

Q.In a four-ball match in which A and B are partners, A employs two caddies at the 3rd hole. Before play of the 3rd hole is completed, A discovers and corrects his breach of Rule 6-4. As the penalty for breach of Rule 6-4 requires an adjustment of the state of the match, how should the penalty be applied in four-ball match play?

A.At the conclusion of the 3rd hole, Side A-B must deduct one hole from the state of the match (Rules 6-4 and 30-3d). In four-ball match play, when a player breaches a Rule that requires an adjustment to the state of the match, the side is penalized. If a breach of a Rule that requires an adjustment to the state of the match in match play arises in four-ball stroke play, both partners incur the applicable stroke play penalty.

30-3/3

Application of Rule 2-2 in Four-Ball Match Play

The second paragraph of Rule 2-2 does not apply in four-ball match play.

Related Decision:

2-2/1 Player Putting for Half is Given Advice by Opponent.

FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: REPRESENTATION OF SIDE

30-3a/1

Absent Partner Joins Match During Play of Hole

Q.Rule 30-3a states in part: "An absent partner may join a match between holes, but not during play of a hole." If A and B are to play C and D in a four-ball match and A is absent when the match begins, what is the ruling if A joins the match during play of a hole?

A.A incurs the general penalty prescribed in Rule 2-6 and thus is disqualified for the hole. If any of A's strokes assisted B's play, B also is disqualified for the hole (Rule 30-3f).

Related Decision:

30-3f/8 Player Disqualified for Next Hole Plays That Hole.

30-3a/2

Absent Partner Gives Advice Before Joining Match

Q.A and B are to play C and D in a four-ball match. A is absent when the match begins. A arrives just after B, C and D have teed off at the 3rd hole. According to Decision 30-3a/1, A is prohibited from joining the match until the 4th hole. Is it permissible for A to give B advice during the play of the 3rd hole?

A.Yes.

30-3a/3

Determination of Handicap Allowances in Four-Ball Match If One Player Unable to Compete

Q.In a four-ball handicap match, the player with the lowest handicap is unable to play. Should the absent player be disregarded in determining the handicap allowances?

A.No. Under Rule 30-3a, a side may be represented by one partner for all or any part of the match. In determining handicap allowances, the handicaps of the three players should be reduced by the handicap of the absent player.

If a wrong handicap is declared for the absent player, Rule 6-2a applies.

BEST-BALL AND FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: ORDER OF PLAY

30-3b/1

Player Entitled to Putt Stands on Another Player's Line of Putt

Q.A and B are partners in a four-ball match. A's ball is closer to the hole than any other ball and it is B's turn to play. Side A-B decide that A will putt before B – Rule 30-3b. However, in doing so A would be standing on B's line of putt or the line of putt of an opponent. What is the ruling?

A.A would be entitled to putt first even if he would be standing on B's line. Rule 30-3b overrides Rule 16-1a, which prohibits touching the line of putt.

A would also be entitled to putt first if he would be standing on an opponent's line of putt. However, it would be a sporting gesture for Side A-B to relinquish A's right to putt first in these circumstances.

30-3b/2

Waiving Turn to Putt in Four-Ball Match

Q.In a four-ball match, A and B are playing C and D. All four balls are on the green in three strokes. The balls of A and C are about 10 feet from the hole; B's ball is two feet away and D's is three feet away. C picks up his ball. A leaves his ball on the green, but tells B and D to "battle it out." D putts first and holes; B then putts and misses. May A then putt for a half?

A.No. A and B abandoned A's right to complete the hole by allowing D to putt before A and B when it was Side A-B's turn to play. Under Rule 30-3b, Side A-B could have opted for B to putt before A. However, if B had done so and missed, it would then have been A's turn to play.

The answer is different if B's ball is three feet away, D's is two feet away and B putts and misses. In these circumstances, A may putt, provided he does so before D putts.

Related Decisions:

30/4 Player Who Walks Off Green Under Mistaken Impression Partner Halved Hole Returns and Putts for Half.

30-3c/2 Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball and Partner Picks Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole.

31-4/1 Player Waives Turn to Play; Circumstances Under Which He May Complete Hole.

FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: PLAY OF WRONG BALL

30-3c/1

Player Plays Partner's Ball

Q.A and B are partners in a four-ball match. By mistake, A putts B's ball and A is disqualified for the hole under Rule 30-3c for playing a wrong ball. B replaces his ball as required by Rule 30-3c and holes his putt. The opponents then claim that B also is disqualified for the hole under Rule 30-3f because A's act of putting B's ball assisted B in determining how much his putt would break, etc. Is the claim valid?

A.No. Rule 30-3c specifically provides that B incurs no penalty. Rule 30-3f is not applicable.

30-3c/2

Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball and Partner Picks Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole

Q.In a four-ball match, Side A-B holed out for a 4. C, a member of Side C-D, then holed a putt for a 3 and his partner, D, picked up what he thought was his ball. After playing from the next tee, it was discovered that C had putted out at the previous hole with D's ball. Side A-B claimed the hole. What is the ruling?

A.C gave wrong information to Side A-B when he did not inform Side A-B as soon as practicable that he had incurred a penalty for playing a wrong ball – see Rule 9-2. Accordingly, a belated claim by Side A-B was valid – Rule 2-5.

The Committee should have ruled that C was disqualified for the hole – Rule 9-2 or 30-3c – and, since D did not complete the hole, Side A-B won the hole.

Related Decisions:

30/4 Player Who Walks Off Green Under Mistaken Impression Partner Halved Hole Returns and Putts for Half.

30-3b/2 Waiving Turn to Putt in Four-Ball Match.

30-3c/3

Players on Opposite Sides Exchange Balls During Play of Hole and Their Partners Pick Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole

Q.A and B were playing C and D in a four-ball match. At the 2nd hole, by mistake A played C's ball and then C played A's. C holed out with A's ball, scoring 5.

A holed out with C's ball, scoring 4. B and D picked up. Thus A and B "won" the hole. The error was discovered during play of the 3rd hole, and Side C-D lodged a claim. What is the ruling?

A.A and C were disqualified for the 2nd hole for playing wrong balls. They should have informed their opponents as soon as practicable, which in this case was as soon as they had the opportunity to discover that they had done so, i.e., when they reached the balls wrongly played to play them again. Because they failed to do so, they gave wrong information (Rule 9-2) and, under Rule 2-5, a belated claim that A (and C as well) was disqualified for the 2nd hole for a breach of Rule 30-3c should be upheld.

It could be argued that B and D's play of the 2nd hole was adversely affected (in that they picked up) and that accordingly Rule 30-3f applies. However, Rule 30-3c specifically provides that the "partner incurs no penalty." This applies even if play of the wrong ball would have assisted the partner – see Decision 30-3c/1 – and by implication it applies in the related case of an adverse effect on an opponent's play.

Furthermore, applying Rule 30-3f for the breaches of Rule 9-2 would not have been proper because those breaches were the direct result of the penalties incurred under Rule 30-3c.

Accordingly, if B picked up before D, Side C-D won the hole. If D picked up before B, Side A-B won the hole. If the order in which B and D picked up was not determinable, the Committee should have ruled that the 2nd hole was halved.

30-3c/4

Player Plays Partner's Ball; Error Discovered After Opponents Have Played Next Strokes

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. At the 2nd hole, after the tee shots A mistakenly plays B's ball. The error is discovered after C and D play their second strokes, and C and D claim the hole. What is the ruling?

A.A is disqualified for the hole because he played a wrong ball (Rule 30-3c). B incurs no penalty for A having played his ball (Decision 30-3c/1) and players B, C and D should continue play of the hole.

Decisions related to 30-3c/2 through 30-3c/4:

2-5/4 Player Wins Hole with Own Ball After Playing Wrong Ball; Opponent Lodges Belated Claim.

9-2/8 Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball; Error Discovered at Next Hole; Opponent Claims Previous Hole.

FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: DISQUALIFICATION OF SIDE

30-3e/1

Partners Fail to Discontinue Play Immediately Contrary to Condition of Competition

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match for which the Committee has adopted the condition of competition, authorized by the Note to Rule 6-8b, requiring players to discontinue play immediately in potentially dangerous situations. The Committee suspends play for a potentially dangerous situation and the players have heard the signal for that suspension. A and B play, and C and D make a claim. What is the ruling?

A.A and B are disqualified.

In four-ball play, when a player is in breach of a condition of competition authorized under a specific Rule, that breach is deemed to come under the appropriate Rule (Rule 6-8 in this case). Both A and B were in breach of the condition of competition and are disqualified – Rule 30-3e(ii).

In four-ball stroke play, Side A-B is disqualified – Rule 31-7b(i).

Related Decisions:

6-8b/5 Player Claiming Danger from Lightning Refuses to Resume Play When Resumption Ordered by Committee.

6-8b/8 Player Drops Ball After Play Suspended for Dangerous Situation.

33-2d/3 Competitor Refuses to Start or Picks Up Because of Weather Conditions; Round Subsequently Canceled.

FOUR-BALL MATCH PLAY: EFFECT OF PENALTY ON PARTNER

30-3f/1

Player Lifts Loose Impediment in Bunker When His Ball and Partner's Ball in Bunker

Q.A and B are partners in a four-ball match. A's ball and B's ball are in the same bunker. A lifts a loose impediment lying in the bunker. A is disqualified for the hole for a breach of Rule 13-4. Does B incur a penalty?

A.If A's infringement assisted B's play, B also is disqualified for the hole (Rule 30-3f). Otherwise, B incurs no penalty.

Related Decisions:

13-4/17 Loose Impediment Removed from Water Hazard; Player Then Decides Not to Play from Hazard.

31-8/1 Competitor Lifts Loose Impediment in Bunker When His Ball and Partner's Ball Are in Bunker.

30-3f/2

Hitting Sand in Bunker with Club After Failing to Extricate Ball; Partner's Ball in Same Bunker

Q.In a four-ball match, A and B were partners. A played a stroke in a bunker and failed to get the ball out of the bunker. He then swung his club into the sand in the bunker, but this action did not affect his new lie in the bunker:

(a) What is the ruling if B's ball lay in the same bunker when A swung his club into the sand?

(b) What is the ruling if B's ball lay elsewhere?

A.In either case, A is disqualified for the hole (Rule 13-4 and Decision 13-4/35). The penalty does not apply to B unless A's action assisted B's play or adversely affected an opponent's play (Rule 30-3f).

30-3f/2.5

Touching Sand with Practice Swing After Partner Has Extricated Ball from Bunker; Four-Ball Match

Q.In a four-ball match, A and B are partners. The balls of A and B lie in the same bunker. A plays a bunker shot and extricates his ball, but it comes to rest in another bunker. Before B makes his stroke in the bunker, B makes a practice swing, touching the sand in the bunker. Is B exempt from penalty by virtue of Exception 3 to Rule 13-4?

A.No. In a four-ball match, the word "player" includes his partner, where the context so admits – see Definition of "Partner." However, in four-ball play, as each partner is playing his own ball, Exception 3 to Rule 13-4 applies only to the player whose ball has been extricated from the bunker. Therefore, while A does not incur any penalty, B is disqualified from the hole (Rules 13-4 and 30-3f).

Decisions related to 30-3f/2 and 30-3f/2.5:

13-4/35 Hitting Sand in Bunker with Club After Failing to Extricate Ball.

29/5 Hitting Sand in Bunker with Club After Failing to Extricate Ball; Foursome Match.

30-3f/3

Player's Ball Resting Against Flagstick Lifted Before Being Holed; Others in Match Pick Up Mistakenly Believing Player Won Hole

Q.In a four-ball match, A's ball rested against the flagstick but it was not holed in terms of the Definition of "Holed." Instead of proceeding under Rule 17-4, A picked up the ball without marking its position. The other three players, believing that A had won the hole, picked up. Before anyone played from the next tee, a spectator pointed out that A's ball had not been holed. The players immediately asked the Committee for a ruling. What would be the correct ruling?

A.A incurred a penalty stroke under Rule 20-1 when he lifted his ball without marking its position. Since A did not inform the opponents about the penalty before they picked up, A was disqualified for the hole for giving wrong information (Rule 9-2). Since A's infringement adversely affected the opponents, i.e., caused them to pick up, A's partner was also disqualified for the hole (Rule 30-3f). Thus, the opponents won the hole.

Related Decisions:

2-5/3 Player Lifts Ball Before Holing Out; Opponent Then Picks Up His Ball Claiming Player Loses Hole.

9-2/6 Player Reporting Wrong Score Causes Opponent with Chance for Half to Pick Up Ball.

17-4/1 Ball Resting Against Flagstick Lifted Before Being Holed.

30/5 In Four-Ball Match Player with Putt for Half Picks Up in Error at Suggestion of Opponent Based on Misunderstanding.

30-3f/4

Wrong Information Given by Player Out of Contention in Four-Ball Match

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match, and the situation is as follows:

• A's ball is on the green; he lies 3.

• B's ball is in a bunker; he lies 5 and it is his turn to play.

• C's ball is on the green; he lies 4.

• D has picked up.

B causes his ball in the bunker to move and incurs a penalty stroke under Rule 18-2a. B does not inform anyone that he has incurred a penalty stroke. B then replaces his ball and plays onto the green.

A then holes out for a 5 and C does likewise.

B is disqualified for the hole under Rule 9-2 for failing to inform C or D, before C played his next stroke, that he (B) had incurred a penalty stroke. Is A also disqualified for the hole under Rule 30-3f on the ground that B's failure to inform C or D of his (B's) penalty stroke adversely affected C's play?

A.No. B was clearly out of contention, and the result of the hole was dependent upon A and C alone. Accordingly, B's failure to inform C or D about the penalty could not have adversely affected C's play.

30-3f/5

Player Attending Flagstick for Opponent Struck by Ball of Opponent's Partner Who Played Out of Turn

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. It is B's turn to play and C is attending the flagstick at B's request. A, whose ball is in a deep bunker in such position that he cannot see C, plays out of turn and his ball strikes C. What is the ruling?

A.B authorized C to attend the flagstick which is the equivalent of A having authorized attendance of the flagstick. See Definition of "Partner," which provides that in a four-ball match, where the context so admits, the word "player" includes his partner.

Accordingly, A is disqualified for the hole (Rule 17-3b), but the penalty does not apply to B (Rule 30-3f).

30-3f/6

Player Plays Away from Hole to Assist Partner

Q.In a four-ball competition, a player purposely putts away from the hole to a position slightly farther from the hole than the spot where his partner's ball lies and on the same line to the hole as his partner's ball. The player then putts towards the hole, and the roll of his ball is helpful to his partner in determining how much his putt will break, etc. Is such a procedure permissible?

A.No. Such procedure is contrary to the spirit of the game. In match play, in equity (Rule 1-4), the player is disqualified for the hole and, since his action assisted his partner's play, the partner incurs the same penalty (Rule 30-3f).

In stroke play, in equity (Rule 1-4), the player incurs a penalty of two strokes and, under Rule 31-8, the partner incurs the same penalty. (Revised)

Related Decisions:

2-4/6 Putting Out After Concession of Stroke.

30-3c/1 Player Plays Partner's Ball.

30-3f/7

Player After Picking Up Drops Ball Where Partner's Ball Lies and Plays Practice Stroke

Q.In four-ball play, A and B are partners. A hits his tee shot out of bounds and decides not to complete play of the hole. B was undecided on club selection for his second shot, so A drops a ball near B's ball and hits a shot towards the green. What penalties were incurred?

A.Since the side, i.e., both A and B, had not completed the play of the hole,A was practicing during play of the hole and thus was in breach of Rule 7-2.

Since it must be assumed that the breach assisted B, he would also be penalized (Rules 30-3f and 31-8).

30-3f/8

Player Disqualified for Next Hole Plays That Hole

Q.In a four-ball match, A practices chip shots to the 18th green between play of the 9th and 10th holes. Thus, A is disqualified for the 10th hole under Rule 7-2. If A plays the 10th hole, is B, A's partner, also subject to disqualification for the 10th hole if A's play of the hole assists B, e.g., with regard to club selection?

A.Since A was disqualified for the 10th hole, the strokes played by him on that hole were practice strokes. Therefore, A was in breach of Rule 7-2 each time he played a stroke on the 10th and, if B was assisted by any such stroke, B incurred the applicable penalty.

Related Decision:

30-3a/1 Absent Partner Joins Match During Play of Hole.

30-3f/9

Player's Ball Moved by Partner in Playing His Own Ball

Q.In four-ball match play, A and B are partners. In playing his own ball, B accidentally strikes the nearby ball of A with his club and causes it to move. What is the procedure?

A.The answer depends on whether A's ball was visible before B played.

If A's ball was visible when B made his stroke, it was reasonably foreseeable that B's stroke at his own ball could cause A's ball to move and, through exercising reasonable care by having A's ball lifted under Rule 22-2, B could have avoided causing A's ball to move. In such circumstances, A incurs a one-stroke penalty under Rule 18-2a and must replace his ball. Assuming the infringement did not assist B, B incurs no penalty (Rule 30-3f).

If A's ball was not visible when B made his stroke, it was not reasonably foreseeable that his stroke could cause A's ball to move and A is not penalized provided he replaces his ball.

If A fails to replace his ball before making his next stroke, he is disqualified from the hole for playing from a wrong place (Rules 18 and 20-7).

Related Decisions:

18-2a/21 Ball Moved Accidentally by Player in Playing Wrong Ball.

18-3b/1 Ball Moved Accidentally by Opponent in Playing His Own Ball.

30-3f/10

Player's Ball Lifted Without Authority by Opponent in a Four-Ball Match

Q.In a four-ball match, an opponent lifted a player's ball on the putting green after marking its position. He did this without the authority of the player. Is the opponent subject to penalty?

A.Yes. Rule 20-1 prohibits such action. Accordingly, the opponent incurs a penalty stroke under Rule 18-3b, but the penalty does not apply to his partner – see Rule 30-3f. The player must replace his ball.

Related Decisions:

20-1/2 Player's Ball Lifted by Opponent Without Authority.

20-1/3 Ball Marked and Lifted by Opponent Without Player's Authority; Player Lifts Ball-Marker, Claims Hole and Opponent Disputes Claim.

30-3f/11

Request to Lift Ball That Might Assist Partner Not Honored

Q.A and B are playing C and D in a four-ball match. B's ball is near the hole in a position to serve as a backstop for A's ball or to assist in lining up A's putt. C requests B to lift his ball. B does not comply and A putts. What is the ruling?

A.B is disqualified for the hole for failing to comply with Rule 22-1. Since it must be assumed that the breach assisted A, he would also be disqualified for the hole – Rule 30-3f. (Revised)

Related Decisions:

2/3 Refusal to Comply with Rule in Match Play.

2-4/8 Player Concedes Opponent's Next Stroke and Plays Before Opponent Has Opportunity to Lift Ball.

16-2/4 Ball Overhanging Lip of Hole Moves When Flagstick Removed.

22/6 Competitor Requests That Ball in Position to Assist Him Not Be Lifted.

30-3f/12

Player in Four-Ball Practices Putts on Previous Green After Partner Has Driven from Next Tee

Q.A and B are partners in a four-ball competition. A was practicing putts on the 4th green after B drove from the 5th tee. Was A in breach of Rule 7-2?

A.Yes.

In match play, A is disqualified for the 5th hole. B incurred no penalty since A's breach did not assist him (Rule 30-3f).

In stroke play, A incurred a penalty of two strokes at the 5th hole. B incurred no penalty since A's breach did not assist him (Rule 31-8).

Related Decision:

29/3 Player in Foursome Match Practices Putts on Previous Green After Partner Has Driven from Next Tee.

30-3f/13

Partner Stands on Extension of Player's Line of Play Behind Ball

Q.A and B are partners in a four-ball competition. A's ball is on the putting green 30 feet from the hole, and B's ball is 20 feet from the hole on a similar line. To assist him with his own putt, B stands on an extension of the line of putt behind A's ball while A putts. What is the ruling?

A.A was in breach of Rule 14-2b by putting with his partner, B, positioned on or close to an extension of the line of putt behind the ball. As A's breach assisted B, B also incurred the same penalty (Rules 30-3f and 31-8).

In match play, Side A-B loses the hole.

In stroke play, A incurs a penalty of two strokes and B incurs the same penalty.

Rules

Decisions

Partner Links
AmEx image
AmEx image
AmEx image
AmEx image
Chevron
   

The USGA and Chevron have committed to using the game of golf to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. This commitment has led to the creation of extensive golf-focused STEM teaching tools, and has resulted in charitable contributions to support golf-related programs through Eagles for Education™

At U.S. Open Championships the Chevron STEM ZONE™ is an interactive experience highlighting the science and math behind the game of golf through a variety of hands-on exhibits and experiments.

The partnership has also produced educational materials such as the Science of Golf video series and a nationally-distributed newspaper insert which are provided to teachers as tools to enhance existing curriculum in schools. These lessons teach the science behind the USGA’s equipment testing, handicapping, and agronomy efforts.

For more interactive experiences featuring golf-focused STEM lessons, visit the partnership homepage.

Chevron image
Rolex
   

Rolex has been a longtime supporter of the USGA and salutes the sportsmanship and great traditions unique to the game. This support includes the Rules of Golf where Rolex has partnered with the USGA to ensure golfers understand and appreciate the game.

As the official timekeeper of the USGA and its championships, they also provide clocks throughout host sites for spectator convenience.

For more information on Rolex and their celebration of the game, visit the Rolex and Golf homepage.



Rolex image
IBM
   

IBM has partnered with the USGA to bring the same technology, expertise, and innovation it provides to businesses all over the world to the USGA and golf's national championship.

IBM provides the information technology to develop and host the U.S. Open’s official website, www.usopen.com, as well as the mobile apps and scoring systems for the three U.S. Open championships. These real-time technology solutions provide an enhanced experience for fans following the championship onsite and online.

For more information on IBM and the technology that powers the U.S. Open and businesses worldwide, visit http://www.usopen.com/IBM

AmEx image
Lexus
   

Lexus is committed to partnering with the USGA to deliver a best-in-class experience for the world’s best golfers by providing a fleet of courtesy luxury vehicles for all USGA Championships.

At each U.S. Open, Women’s Open and Senior Open, Lexus provides spectators with access to unique experiences ranging from the opportunity to have a picture taken with both the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open trophies to autograph signings with legendary Lexus Golf Ambassadors in the Lexus Performance Drive Pavilion.

For more information on Lexus, visit http://www.lexus.com/

AmEx image
American Express
   

Together, American Express and the USGA have been providing world-class service to golf fans since 2006. By creating interactive U.S. Open experiences both onsite and online, American Express enhances the USGA’s effort to make the game more accessible and enjoyable for fans.

For more information on American Express visit www.americanexpress.com/entertainment


AmEx image