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TEEING GROUND AND TEEING

Decisions related to Rule 11-1: See "Teeing Ground and Tee-Markers" in the Index.

TEE-MARKERS

11-2/1

Status of Tee-Markers After First Stroke

Q.Under Rule 11-2, tee-markers are deemed to be fixed before making the first stroke with any ball from the teeing ground. Are tee-markers movable obstructions thereafter?

A.Yes. (Revised)

11-2/2

Tee-Marker Moved by Player

Rule 11-2 states that before a player plays his first stroke with any ball from the teeing ground, the tee-markers are deemed to be fixed. Thereafter, Decision 11-2/1 clarifies that they are obstructions and if movable, may be moved (see Definition of "Obstruction").

In view of the fact that tee-markers are initially fixed, and when moved can have a significant effect on the competition, the following are examples of the appropriate ruling in various circumstances. In all cases a moved tee-marker should be replaced. In some cases, the replacement of the tee-marker may affect the penalty to the player.

(a) A player moves a tee-marker before playing his first stroke with any ball from the teeing ground because the tee-marker interferes with the lie of the ball, his stance or his area of intended swing – loss of hole in match play or two strokes in stroke play for breach of Rule 13-2.

(b) A player moves a tee-marker before or after playing a stroke from the teeing ground because, in his view, the tee-markers are too close together, too far back, aimed in the wrong direction, or some similar reason – disqualification under Rule 33-7, unless the tee-marker is replaced before the player or any other player plays from the teeing ground, in which case the penalty is modified to loss of hole in match play or two strokes in stroke play.

(c) A player moves a tee-marker before or after playing a stroke from the teeing ground as a result of falling over the marker – no penalty and the tee-marker should be replaced.

(d) A player moves a tee-marker before or after playing a stroke from the teeing ground as a result of intentionally kicking it or striking it with a club – no penalty and the tee-marker should be replaced.

(e) A player lifts a tee-marker before or after playing a stroke from the teeing ground for no apparent reason and without authority under the Rules – no penalty and the tee-marker should be replaced.

Other Decisions related to Rule 11-2: See "Teeing Ground and Tee-Markers" in the Index.

BALL FALLING OFF TEE

11-3/1

Stroke Misses Ball; Ball Then Accidentally Knocked Off Tee

Q.A player teed his ball within the teeing ground. He made a stroke at the ball but missed it. He addressed the ball again and accidentally knocked it off the tee. What is the ruling?

A.When the player made a stroke at the ball, it was in play and Rule 11-3 no longer applied. When the ball in play moved after it was addressed, the player incurred a penalty stroke and was obliged to replace the ball (Rule 18-2b).

Related Decision:

18-2a/2 Ball Falling Off Tee When Stroke Just Touches It Is Picked Up and Re-Teed.

11-3/2 (Reserved)

11-3/3

Original Ball Out of Bounds; Ball Played Under Stroke-and-Distance Procedure Falls Off Tee at Address

Q.A player played his original ball out of bounds from the teeing ground. Under Rule 27-1, he teed up another ball. When addressing the ball, he touched it and it fell off the tee. What is the ruling?

A.There is no penalty, because a teed ball is not in play until a stroke has been made at it (see Definition of "Ball in Play"). The ball may be re-teed (Rule 11-3).

Related Decision:

18-2a/19 Ball Moved Accidentally by Practice Swing Prior to Tee Shot.

PLAYING FROM OUTSIDE TEEING GROUND IN MATCH PLAY

11-4a/1

Player with Honor Plays from Outside Teeing Ground; Order of Play If Opponent Requires Player to Cancel Stroke

Q.In match play, the player with the honor plays from outside the teeing ground. His opponent immediately requires the player to cancel his stroke in accordance with Rule 11-4a Does the player retain the honor?

A.Yes. The player's next stroke from the tee is not considered a second ball as the term is used in Rule 10-3.

Other Decisions related to Rule 11-4a:

11-5/3 Ball Played Out of Bounds from Wrong Teeing Ground Not Recalled.

29-1/1 Ball Played from Outside Teeing Ground in Foursome Match.

PLAYING FROM OUTSIDE TEEING GROUND IN STROKE PLAY

11-4b/1 (Reserved)

11-4b/2

Competitors Estimate Area of Teeing Ground When One Tee-Marker Missing

Q.In stroke play, competitors in a group, finding one tee-marker missing from a teeing ground, determine for themselves the area of the teeing ground based on the position of the remaining tee-marker and the shape of the tee. What is the ruling?

A.The correct procedure is to discontinue play until the Committee resolves the problem.

However, if the Committee is satisfied that the competitors did not gain an advantage by playing from the place they judged to be the teeing ground, it would be appropriate for the Committee, in equity (Rule 1-4), to accept their scores, without penalty. Otherwise, they incur the penalty prescribed in Rule 11-4b.

11-4b/3

Competitors Determine Spot from Which to Play from Tee When Both Tee-Markers Are Missing

Q.In stroke play, the competitors in a group, finding no tee-markers on a particular hole, determine for themselves the spot from which to begin play on the hole, and tee off. What is the ruling?

A.It would be appropriate for the Committee to accept without penalty the scores of the competitors in question if there was evidence as to where the tee-markers were intended to be and the competitors determined the teeing ground from such evidence and played from within such teeing ground. Sufficient evidence might include spots of paint established to show where the tee-markers were to be installed or, if the tee-markers were removed during a round, depressions or other marks on the ground indicating where the tee-markers had been located.

In the absence of such evidence, the competitors should be disqualified under Rule 11-4b unless, before playing from the next tee, they discontinue play, get the Committee to establish tee-markers and replay the hole from within the established teeing ground. Any competitor so replaying would incur a penalty of two strokes (Rule 11-4b).

11-4b/4 (Reserved)

11-4b/5 (Reserved)

11-4b/6

Ball Played from Outside Teeing Ground Goes Out of Bounds

Q.In stroke play, A played from outside the teeing ground and his ball came to rest out of bounds. He played another ball from within the teeing ground. Is he penalized stroke and distance under Rule 27-1, as well as two strokes under Rule 11-4b?

A.No. A is penalized only two strokes under Rule 11-4b. The ball played from outside the teeing ground was not in play. Therefore, the fact that it came to rest out of bounds was irrelevant and the stroke itself did not count.

Other Decisions related to Rule 11-4b:

11-5/4 Ball Played from Wrong Teeing Ground in Stroke Play; Error Corrected.

29-1/2 Competitor Plays from Outside Teeing Ground in Foursome Stroke Play; Partner Replays Stroke.

34-3/4 Dispute as to Whether Competitor Played from Outside Teeing Ground.

PLAYING FROM WRONG TEEING GROUND

11-5/1

Explanation of "Next Teeing Ground" When Competitors Have Played from Wrong Teeing Ground

Q.In stroke play, two competitors, having completed the 11th hole, played from the 15th tee, completed the hole and played from the 16th tee. Before playing their second shots they realized their mistake, returned to the 12th tee and completed the round. On reporting the incident the competitors were each penalized two strokes, as the Committee interpreted the "next teeing ground" referred to in Rule 11-4b to be that of the 12th hole. Was this correct?

A.No. When the competitors played from the 16th tee, they had played from the "next teeing ground" and could not correct their error. Therefore, they should have been disqualified.

11-5/2

Use of Wrong Teeing Ground Attributable to Committee Failure to Indicate Hole Numbers on Teeing Grounds

Q.In a stroke-play competition, the Committee failed to place a sign at each teeing ground indicating the hole number. As a result, a group which had just finished the 4th hole played from the teeing ground of the 12th hole, rather than the 5th hole. Should the members of the group be penalized under Rule 11-4b in the circumstances?

A.Yes.

The Committee was remiss in not placing a sign at each teeing ground. However, each player is responsible for knowing the stipulated round, this being one of the conditions of the competition.

11-5/3

Ball Played Out of Bounds from Wrong Teeing Ground Not Recalled

Q.A played B in a match. A drove out of bounds from the wrong teeing ground. B did not recall the stroke. What is the ruling?

A.As A played from the wrong teeing ground and B did not require him to cancel the stroke and play a ball from within the correct teeing ground, A's ball has been put into play (see Definition of "Ball in Play").

Therefore, under Rule 27-1 A must drop a ball, under penalty of one stroke, as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was played, i.e., on the wrong teeing ground. He could not tee the ball because the original ball was not played from the teeing ground of the hole being played (Rule 20-5).

11-5/4

Ball Played from Wrong Teeing Ground in Stroke Play: Error Corrected

Q.In stroke play, after finishing the 10th hole, A and B played from the teeing ground of the 15th hole instead of the 11th hole. They realized their error before completing the 15th hole, returned to the 11th tee and completed the round. What is the ruling?

A.A and B each incurred a penalty of two strokes under Rule 11-4b. They were correct in discontinuing play at the 15th hole and returning to the 11th hole. Strokes played at the 15th hole, when it was played out of order, did not count.

Related Decisions:

11-4b/6 Ball Played from Outside Teeing Ground Goes Out of Bounds.

29-1/2 Competitor Plays from Outside Teeing Ground in Foursome Stroke Play; Partner Replays Stroke.

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