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MATCHES: GENERAL

2/1

Players in Singles Match Accompanied by Third Party

Q.Prior to a singles match between A and B, A stated to B that a third player, C, would be playing with them. B played the match under protest and lost. What ruling should the Committee give?

A.A single is a match in which one plays against another. Since B made a timely claim, the Committee should have awarded the match to B. If B had not protested, i.e., had agreed that C accompany the match, the result of the match would stand as played.

2/2

Stipulated Round in Match Play

In all forms of match play other than threesomes and foursomes, a player has begun his stipulated round when he makes his first stroke in that round. In threesomes and foursomes match play, the side has begun its stipulated round when it makes its first stroke in that round.

The stipulated round has ended in match play when all of the players in the match have completed the final hole of the match (although a player may lodge a subsequent claim under Rule 2-5 or correct wrong information under Rule 9-2b(iii)). With the first round of a 36-hole match, the stipulated round has ended when all the players in the match have completed the final hole of that stipulated round.

2/3

Refusal to Comply with Rule in Match Play

Q.In a match, A requests B to lift B's ball that is on A's line of play. B refuses to do so. What is the ruling?

A.In equity (Rule 1-4), B loses the hole for failing to comply with A's request to lift his ball under Rule 22-2.

Related Decisions: See "Refusal to Comply with Rule" in the Index.

MATCH PLAY: GENERAL

2-1/1

Players Unable to Resolve Rules Problem Agree to Consider Hole Halved

Q.In a match, A putted to within three inches of the hole and then knocked his ball away. B, the opponent, objected. He stated that he wanted A's ball left by the hole. A and B were uncertain how to resolve the matter, so they agreed to consider the hole halved. Should A and B be disqualified under Rule 1-3?

A.No. There was no agreement to waive the Rules. Rather, the players were ignorant of the Rules.

Related Decisions:

1-3/5 Players Unaware Penalty Incurred.

2-5/8.5 Player and Opponent Agree on Incorrect Procedure; Whether Valid Claim May Be Made After Procedure Followed.

2-1/1.5

Players Agree to Consider Hole Halved During Play of Hole

Q.In a match, a player and his opponent play their second shots on a par 5 hole. Unexpectedly, neither ball can be found. Rather than proceeding under Rule 27-1, both players agree to a half. Is this permitted?

A.Yes. An agreement to halve a hole being played is permissible.

However, if the players agree to consider a hole halved without either player making a stroke, they should be disqualified under Rule 1-3 for agreeing to exclude the operation of Rule 2-1 by failing to play the stipulated round, provided the players knew that this was a breach of the Rules. (Revised)

2-1/2

Minus or Zero Net Score

Q.In a handicap match, a player entitled to two handicap strokes at a par-3 hole scores a 2 or a hole-in-one. What would be his net score in each case?

A.The player's net score would be zero (0) if he scored a 2 or minus 1 (-1) if he had a hole-in-one.

The same would be true in a four-ball stroke-play or Stableford competition since scores are calculated on a hole-by-hole basis.

2-1/3

Hole Inadvertently Omitted in Match; Error Discovered After Match Concluded

Q.The players in a match inadvertently omitted playing a hole. The error was discovered after the match had been played to a conclusion. What is the ruling?

A.The result should stand.

2-1/4

Two Holes Purposely Omitted in Match

Q.Without the authority of the Committee, the players in a match agreed to omit two holes, i.e., agreed to settle the match over 16 holes. Is this permitted?

A.No. The players are disqualified under Rule 1-3 for excluding the operation of Rule 2-1 by failing to play the stipulated round, provided the players knew that this was a breach of the Rules. If they did not know that their action was a breach of the Rules, the match stands as played. (Revised)

2-1/5

Three Holes Played Out of Sequence in Match

Q.In a match, the players by mistake play three holes out of sequence. The error is discovered before the match concludes. What is the ruling?

A.There is no penalty, and those three holes stand as played. If the players were to replay the three holes in the proper sequence, there would be no penalty, and the three holes would stand as replayed.

2-1/6

Replaying Match When Play Discontinued Instead of Resuming from Where Play Stopped

Q.A match which was all square after 16 holes was discontinued by agreement due to darkness. The match should have been resumed at the 17th hole. However, the players, thinking it was in accordance with the Rules, replayed the match starting at the 1st tee. The result was posted. At that point the Committee became aware of the improper procedure. What is the ruling?

A.The result of the match as replayed should stand. The players were not subject to disqualification under Rule 1-3 because they were unaware that their procedure was contrary to the Rules.

HALVED HOLE

2-2/1

Player Putting for Half Is Given Advice by Opponent

The following is an example of the application of the second paragraph of Rule 2-2: In a match, A has holed out. As B, A's opponent, is preparing to putt for a half, A gives B advice as to his line of putt. A would normally lose the hole for a breach of Rule 8-1, but Rule 2-2 becomes operative in these circumstances and the hole is halved.

Related Decision:

30-3/3 Application of Rule 2-2 in Four-Ball Match Play.

Other Decisions related to Rule 2-2: See "Halved Hole" in the Index.

WINNER OF MATCH

2-3/1

Players Under Impression Match Is Over Later Realize It Was All Square

Q.In a match, A and B left the 18th green under the impression that A had won. They later realized that in fact the match was all square. The matter was referred to the Committee. What is the ruling?

A.Since there was no indication that wrong information had been given, the match stands as played, with A the winner.

2-3/2

Result of Match When Player Dormie and Opponent Concedes

Q.In a match between A and B, A is one up playing the last hole. In the following situations and considering B's actions, does A win by one hole or two holes?

(i) B is on the green in three strokes but a long way from the hole. A plays his third stroke from the edge of the green and it comes to rest about one foot from the hole. B goes over and shakes hands with A.

(ii) B is on the green in two strokes. A holes his third stroke and B shakes hands with A.

(iii) A plays his second shot from the fairway on to the green. B's second shot misses the green and plugs in a bunker. B immediately walks over to A and shakes his hand.

(iv) B is on the green in six strokes but a long way from the hole. A plays his third stroke from the edge of the green and it comes to rest about one foot from the hole. B goes over and shakes hands with A.

(v) A is on the green in two strokes. B plays his third stroke from the fairway onto the green and the ball comes to rest about one foot from the hole. B goes over and shakes hands with A.

A.The handshake between the players is deemed to represent an agreement to concede each player's next stroke. Accordingly, in situations (i)–(iii), A wins the match by one hole. In situations (iv) and (v), A has won the final hole and wins the match by two holes.

CONCESSION OF MATCH, HOLE OR NEXT STROKE

2-4/1

Player Concedes Opponent's Next Stroke and Then Knocks Opponent's Ball into Hole

Q.A player conceded his opponent's next stroke and then, in attempting to knock the opponent's ball back to him, he inadvertently knocked the ball into the hole. The opponent, who had played three strokes prior to the concession, claimed a 3 for the hole. Was the claim valid?

A.No. The player conceded the opponent a 4 for the hole and, at that point, the opponent had completed the hole. It is irrelevant that the player subsequently knocked the opponent's ball into the hole, whether he did so inadvertently or otherwise.

2-4/2

Ball Falls into Hole After Concession of Next Stroke

Q.A player's ball overhung the edge of the hole. After elapse of the time allowed in Rule 16-2, the opponent conceded the player's next stroke for a 5, after which the player's ball fell into the hole. What was the player's score for the hole?

A.The player's score was 5. It is immaterial that the player's ball fell into the hole after the opponent had conceded the player's next stroke. If the opponent had not conceded the next stroke, the player's score would also be 5 because in those circumstances the player would be deemed to have holed out with his last stroke and he would incur a penalty stroke – Rule 16-2.

Related Decisions:

1-2/4 Player Jumps Close to Hole to Cause Ball to Drop; Ball Moves.

16-2/2 Ball Overhanging Hole Knocked Away by Opponent Before Player Determines Status.

18-2b/10 Ball Falls into Hole After Being Addressed.

2-4/3

Player Lifts Ball in Mistaken Belief That Next Stroke Conceded

Q.In a match between A and B, B made a statement which A interpreted to mean that his (A's) next stroke was conceded. Accordingly, A lifted his ball. B then said that he had not conceded A's next stroke. What is the ruling?

A.If B's statement could reasonably have led A to think his next stroke had been conceded, in equity (Rule 1-4), A should replace his ball as near as possible to where it lay, without penalty.

Otherwise, A would incur a penalty stroke for lifting his ball without marking its position – Rule 20-1 – and he must replace his ball as near as possible to where it lay.

2-4/3.5

Stroke Conceded by Caddie

Q.In a match between A and B, B's caddie purports to concede A's next stroke, whereupon A lifts his ball. What is the ruling?

A.As a player's caddie does not have the authority to make a concession, the purported concession is invalid. As A had reasonably believed his next stroke had been conceded, in equity (Rule 1-4), A incurs no penalty and must replace the ball. B incurs no penalty; however, had B's caddie lifted A's ball, B would have incurred a one-stroke penalty under Rule 18-3b.

Decisions related to 2-4/3 and 2-4/3.5:

9-2/5 Incorrect Information Causes Opponent to Lift His Ball-Marker.

20-1/8 Ball-Marker Lifted by Player Who Mistakenly Believes He Has Won Hole.

26-1/9 Caddie Lifts Ball in Water Hazard Without Player's Authority.

2-4/4

Whether Picking Up Opponent's Ball Is Concession of Next Stroke

Q.In match play, A holes a putt and, thinking he has won the match, picks up B's ball. B then advises A that he (B) had a putt to win the hole. Did A concede B's next stroke when he picked up B's ball?

A.No. A incurred a penalty stroke under Rule 18-3b; B must replace his ball and now has two putts to win the hole.

2-4/5

Whether Lifting Opponent's Ball-Marker Is Concession of Next Stroke

Q.In a match, A believing he has won a hole picks up the coin marking the position of his opponent B's ball. In fact B had a putt to halve the hole. Should the picking up of B's ball-marker be considered a concession of B's next stroke?

A.No. In equity (Rule 1-4), A should be penalized one stroke. Therefore, under the second paragraph of Rule 2-2 the hole is automatically halved.

Decisions related to 2-4/4 and 2-4/5:

2-4/17 Player in Erroneous Belief Match Is Over Shakes Opponent's Hand and Picks Up Opponent's Ball.

30/5 In Four-Ball Match Player with Putt for Half Picks Up in Error at Suggestion of Opponent Based on Misunderstanding.

2-4/6

Putting Out After Concession of Stroke

Rule 2-4 does not cover the question of whether a player may putt out after his next stroke has been conceded. A player incurs no penalty for holing out in such circumstances. However, if the act would be of assistance to a partner in a four-ball or best-ball match, the partner is, in equity (Rule 1-4), disqualified for the hole.

2-4/7

Concession of Stroke Refused by Player and Withdrawn by Opponent; Player Then Putts and Misses

Q.In a match between A and B, A putts and his ball comes to rest near the hole. B concedes A's next stroke. A says: "No. I haven't holed out yet." B says: "OK. Go ahead and putt." A putts and misses. In such circumstances, is the concession invalidated?

A.No. When B conceded A's next stroke, A had completed the hole. Concession of a stroke may not be declined or withdrawn – see Rule 2-4.

2-4/8

Player Concedes Opponent's Next Stroke and Plays Before Opponent Has Opportunity to Lift Ball

Q.In a match between A and B, A chips and his ball comes to rest about one foot from the hole. B concedes A's next stroke. A states that he wishes to lift his ball. However, B proceeds to play his next stroke before A has an opportunity to lift his ball and B's ball strikes A's ball. What is the ruling?

A.B deprived A of his right to lift his ball after his next stroke was conceded. In equity (Rule 1-4), B lost the hole, whether or not his ball struck A's ball.

Related Decisions:

2/3 Refusal to Comply with Rule in Match Play.

3-4/1 Competitor Not Given Opportunity to Lift Ball Assisting Fellow-Competitor.

16-2/4 Ball Overhanging Lip of Hole Moves When Flagstick Removed.

17-4/2 Ball Resting Against Flagstick; Putt Conceded and Ball Removed Before Player Can Remove Flagstick.

22/6 Competitor Requests That Ball in Position to Assist Him Not Be Lifted.

30-3f/11 Request to Lift Ball That Might Assist Partner Not Honored.

2-4/9

Player Concedes Hole After Which It Is Discovered Opponent Had Played Wrong Ball

Q.In a match between A and B, A has made two strokes and the ball with which he made his second stroke out of the rough is on the green. B, having played five, concedes the hole to A. A then discovers that he has played a wrong ball to the green. What is the ruling?

A.A lost the hole (Rule 15-3a) before B conceded it to him. Therefore, B's concession was irrelevant.

2-4/10 (Reserved)

2-4/11

Player with Lost Ball Concedes Hole; Ball Then Found in Hole

Q.In a match, A played his second shot towards the green but he could not find his ball. He conceded the hole to B, whose second shot was on the green. The following players then found A's ball in the hole. What is the ruling?

A.Since a player may not concede a hole after conclusion of the hole (Rule 2-4) A holed out in two strokes and won the hole if he made a claim before B played from the next teeing ground (Rule 2-5). If A did not do so, he lost the hole.

Related Decisions:

1-1/4 Player Discovers Own Ball Is in Hole After Playing Wrong Ball.

2-5/5 Invalid Claim Not Disputed.

9-2/11 Opponent's Misreading of Number on Player's Ball Results in Agreement That Player Lost Hole.

2-4/12

Player Concedes Hole on Basis of Invalid Claim

Q.In a match between A and B, A putts out of turn. B incorrectly claims that A loses the hole for putting out of turn. A protests but concedes the hole. Later, A, having consulted the Rule book, lodges an official protest with the Committee. How should the Committee rule?

A.Although B's claim was invalid – see Rule 10-1c – A lost the hole when he conceded it (Rule 2-4).

2-4/13

Implied Concession of Hole Withdrawn

Q.A, unable to find his ball after a two-minute search, suggests to B, his opponent, that they move on to the next hole. A's ball is then found. A withdraws his suggestion to move on to the next hole and play is resumed. Before A plays his ball, B plays a stroke with a wrong ball. What is the ruling?

A.A's suggestion amounted to a concession of the hole and B won the hole. Concession of a hole may not be withdrawn (Rule 2-4). B's actions after A's concession could not deprive him of a hole already won.

2-4/14

Player Concedes Match Due to Misconception as to Opponent's Score at Last Hole

Q.In a match, A and B were all square playing the last hole. A had a short putt for a 4. B holed a putt for a 4. A, mistakenly believing that B had holed out in three strokes, shook hands with B, conceded the match and lifted his ball. At that point B told A that he (B) had scored a 4. What is the ruling?

A.A conceded the match. Even if A had not conceded the match, he lost it when he lifted his ball without marking its position and thereby incurred a penalty stroke under Rule 20-1.

2-4/15

Player Concedes Match After Winning It When Opponent Lodges Invalid Claim Regarding Strokes Taken

Q.In a match, A and B were all square playing the last hole. A incurred a penalty without knowing it, and accordingly did not advise B of the penalty. B was aware of what had happened but did not realize it was a breach of the Rules either.

A won the hole and the match, and the result was posted.

Subsequently, a spectator informed B that A had incurred a penalty at the 18th hole. B then claimed the hole and the match, and A conceded the match to B.

Who was the rightful winner?

A.A won the match because a match can only be conceded prior to its conclusion (Rule 2-4).

A gave wrong information when he did not advise B that he had incurred a penalty and would have lost the hole had a claim been made in a timely manner – Rule 9-2b(i). However, a belated claim by B was not valid for two reasons:

(1) it was not based on facts previously unknown to B, and

(2) the claim was made after the result of the match was announced – see Rule 2-5.

2-4/16

Valid Timely Claim Made After Concession of Match

Q.In a match, A and B are playing the last hole. B is 1 up. A holes out for a 4. B putts from a wrong place and holes the putt for a 4. A congratulates B and concedes the match. Before leaving the putting green, A asks B if he (B) had putted from a wrong place. B acknowledges that he did so. A claims that B loses the hole under Rule 20-7b. Is the claim valid?

A.Yes. Concession of a match is not binding if subsequently a valid claim is made in a timely manner. A's valid claim was made within the time limit in Rule 2-5.

Related Decision:

9-2/10 Player Omits Penalty Stroke When Advising Opponent as to Score for Hole; Error Discovered After Match Conceded by Opponent.

2-4/17

Player in Erroneous Belief Match Is Over Shakes Opponent's Hand and Picks Up Opponent's Ball

Q.In match play, A holes a putt and, thinking he has won the match, shakes hands with B and picks up B's ball. The referee advises B that he had a putt to win the hole and keep the match alive. Has B conceded the match by his acquiescence in A's action of shaking hands and picking up B's ball?

A.No. B was entitled to replace his ball and hole out. Since A incurred a one-stroke penalty under Rule 18-3b, B now had two putts to win the hole.

Related Decisions:

2-4/4 Whether Picking Up Opponent's Ball Is Concession of Next Stroke.

2-4/5 Whether Lifting Opponent's Ball-Marker Is Concession of Next Stroke.

30/5 In Four-Ball Match Player with Putt for Half Picks Up in Error at Suggestion of Opponent Based on Misunderstanding.

2-4/18 (Reserved)

2-4/19

Winner of Match Wishes to Default to Beaten Opponent

Q.In match play, A defeats B and then concedes the match to B because he (A) cannot continue in the competition. Is this permissible?

A.No. A won the match. A beaten player may not be reinstated in such circumstances. A should be posted as the winner and, since A cannot continue, A's opponent in the next round would win by default.

Under Rule 2-4, a side may concede a match at any time prior to conclusion of the match, but not thereafter.

2-4/20

Player Unable to Meet Match-Play Schedule Defaults; Schedule Then Changed and Player Requests Reinstatement

Q.The final matches in a competition were to be played on a Saturday. A was to play B in one match. On Thursday, A defaulted to B, saying that he would be out of town on Saturday.

On Saturday, the course was unplayable and the matches were postponed until the following Saturday.

On Monday, A requested that he be reinstated. Should the Committee reinstate A?

A.No. A conceded the match as provided for in Rule 2-4. In the circumstances, concession is irrevocable.

Related Decision:

6-8b/4 Player Unable to Resume Suspended Match at Scheduled Time.

2-4/21

Wrong Form of Play Used to Decide Which Side Concedes Match

Q.In a foursome match, the players are unable to arrange a date to play their match within the prescribed time limit for the round. As a result, the players agree to play a singles match between one player from each side in order to decide which side would concede the match in accordance with Rule 2-4. Is this permissible?

A.There is nothing in the Rules of Golf to prohibit players from agreeing to a method of determining which side will concede a match. However, in view of the intention of Rule 1-3 (Agreement to Waive Rules), if players agree to play a match other than in the form prescribed in the conditions of the competition in order to decide which side will concede, both sides should be disqualified under Rule 1-3 for agreeing to exclude the operation of a condition of competition (Rule 33-1).

If the players agree to use some other method which does not involve playing a match to determine which side will concede, such as a putting competition, tossing a coin, etc., they are not considered to be in breach of Rule 1-3.

Related Decisions:

1-3/7 Agreement That Side Losing After 18 Holes of 36-Hole Match Will Concede Match.

6-1/1 Wrong Form of Play Used in Match-Play Event.

33-1/4 Match Decided by Wrong Form of Play by Agreement of Players.

2-4/22

Players Agree to Concede Holes to Each Other

Q.Before or during a match, A and B agree to concede one or more holes to each other, thereby enabling them, in effect, to play a shorter match. If A and B know that such an arrangement is not permissible, are they subject to disqualification under Rule 1-3?

A.Yes. Although Rule 2-4 allows a player to concede a hole before playing it, an agreement between players to concede holes to each other exceeds this authority as it undermines the principle in Rule 2-1 of playing a stipulated round. Therefore, such an agreement constitutes an agreement to waive the Rules.

Other Decisions related to Rule 2-4: See "Concession" and "Default" in the Index

DOUBT AS TO PROCEDURE: DISPUTES AND CLAIMS

2-5/1 (Reserved)

2-5/2

Procedure for a Valid Claim

For a claim to be valid, the claimant must notify his opponent (i) that he is making a claim or wants a ruling and, (ii) the facts of the situation. He must do so within the time required by Rule 2-5. For example, Rule 16-1e prohibits putting from a stance astride an extension of the line of putt behind the ball. In a match between A and B, if A putts from a stance astride an extension of the line and B states "that is not allowed, you are penalized" or "I'm making a claim because of that stroke," the Committee should consider the claim.

Statements by B such as "I'm not sure that's allowed" or "I don't think you can do that" do not by themselves constitute a valid claim because each statement does not contain the notice of a claim or that he wants a ruling and the facts of the situation.

2-5/3

Player Lifts Ball Before Holing Out; Opponent Then Picks Up His Ball Claiming Player Loses Hole

Q.In match play, A's ball was resting against the flagstick but it was not holed. A, believing he had holed out, lifted his ball without first marking its position. In doing so, A incurred a penalty stroke under Rule 20-1. Since A was not aware that he had incurred a penalty, he did not inform B. B, who had not witnessed A's actions, made his next stroke. A's actions were then brought to the attention of B and he picked up his ball, claiming that A's lifting of his ball entailed a penalty of loss of hole. A and B agreed to continue the match and refer B's claim to the Committee later. How should the Committee have ruled?

A.The Committee should have ruled that B won the hole. B's claim was valid since he notified his opponent that he was making a claim or wanted a ruling (A and B agreed to refer B's claim to the Committee), and the facts that gave rise to the claim (A's lifting of the ball). Although the penalty for A's lifting of the ball without first marking its position is one stroke, he lost the hole for giving wrong information (Rule 9-2b) when he failed to inform B before he (B) made his next stroke that he (A) had incurred the penalty stroke.

Related Decisions:

9-2/6 Player Reporting Wrong Score Causes Opponent with Chance for Half to Pick Up Ball.

30/5 In Four-Ball Match Player with Putt for Half Picks Up in Error at Suggestion of Opponent Based on Misunderstanding.

30-3f/3 Player's Ball Resting Against Flagstick Lifted Before Being Holed; Others in Match Pick Up Mistakenly Believing Player Won Hole.

2-5/4

Player Wins Hole with Own Ball After Playing Wrong Ball; Opponent Lodges Belated Claim

Q.In a match, A and B are all square playing the last hole. A plays a wrong ball in the rough and discovers the error before his next stroke. A and B go back to look for A's ball without any question being raised as to whether A had incurred a penalty. A's ball is found. A plays out the hole with his original ball and wins the hole and the match.

Several days later B claims the last hole and the match by virtue of the fact that A played a wrong ball.

Is the claim valid?

A.No. A gave wrong information when he did not advise B that he (A) had incurred a penalty – Rule 9-2b(i). However, a belated claim by B was not valid for two reasons:

(1) it was not based on facts previously unknown to B, and

(2) the claim was made after the result of the match was announced – see Rule 2-5.

Related Decisions:

9-2/8 Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball; Error Discovered at Next Hole; Opponent Claims Previous Hole.

30-3c/2 Player Wins Hole with Wrong Ball and Partner Picks Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole.

30-3c/3 Players on Opposite Sides Exchange Balls During Play of Hole and Their Partners Pick Up; Error Discovered at Next Hole.

30-3c/4 Player Plays Partner's Ball; Error Discovered After Opponents Have Played Next Strokes.

2-5/5

Invalid Claim Not Disputed

Q.In a match, A played a wrong ball to a green and then found his own ball in the hole. His own ball had been holed in three strokes, which was fewer strokes than B had taken. However, B claimed the hole on the grounds that A had played a wrong ball. A did not dispute the claim. A lost the match.

Later, A learned that, because he had completed the hole when his own ball was holed and before play of a wrong ball, the play of the wrong ball was irrelevant and he was the rightful winner of the hole in question. A then lodged a claim with the Committee. Was the claim valid?

A.No. Since A did not dispute B's invalid claim before B played from the next teeing ground, B's claim stands and B won the hole in question (Rule 2-5).

Related Decisions:

2-4/11 Player with Lost Ball Concedes Hole; Ball Then Found in Hole.

9-2/11 Opponent's Misreading of Number on Player's Ball Results in Agreement That Player Lost Hole.

2-5/5.5

Breach of 14-Club Rule Discovered After Match Concluded But Before Result Officially Announced

Q.On completion of the 14th hole in a match between A and B, A wins by 5 and 4. The players continue the round. After the 16th hole, it is discovered by the players that A has 15 clubs in his bag.

Before the result of the match has been officially announced, B reports the facts to the Committee and asks for a ruling. Is the claim valid?

A.Yes. Although the players had left the putting green of the last hole of the match, B's claim is based on facts previously unknown to him and he is deemed to have been given wrong information by A (Rule 9-2b(i)). The players must return to the 15th hole and resume the match. A is penalized under Rule 4-4a and is three up with four holes to play.

2-5/6

Players Mistakenly Believe Match Is All Square After 18 Holes and Play Extra Hole Without Claim Being Made

Q.In a match between A and B, A is 1 up after the prescribed 18 holes. However, both A and B believe the match is all square. So they play extra holes and B wins at the 20th hole. The error is then discovered. What is the ruling?

A.Since A did not make a claim before either player played from the tee at the 19th hole, the match must be considered all square at that point. Thus, B was the winner.

2-5/7

Rightful Winner of Match Makes No Claim and Agrees to Play Extra Holes

Q.In a match, A and B are all square going to the 18th hole. On completion of the 18th hole, B states that he has scored 7; A states that he (A) has scored 6. A and B go into the clubhouse under the impression that A has won the match. At that point B tells A that, on reflection, he (B) believes A scored 7 at the 18th hole. On recounting, A acknowledges that he had a 7.

By agreement, A and B resume the match; A wins it at the 20th hole and the result is posted.

That night, B discovers that, because A gave wrong information after completion of the 18th hole, under Rule 9-2b(iii) he (B) was rightfully the winner of the 18th hole and the match. B reports the matter to the Committee and claims the match. What is the ruling?

A.The match stands as played, with A the winner.

B's claim was not made within the time limit in Rule 2-5. B's claim would have been valid if he had refused to play extra holes or had played the extra holes under protest.

2-5/8

Status of Valid Claim If Players Accept Wrong Ruling from Someone Not on Committee and Continue Match

Q.In an 18-hole match between A and B, A's ball strikes the flagstick which was attended by B. A and B believe that a loss-of-hole penalty is incurred but they are in doubt as to which one of them incurs the penalty. Accordingly, before teeing off at the next hole, they agree to refer the matter to the Committee later.

At the conclusion of 18 holes, A and B agree that if B incurred a loss-of-hole penalty at the hole in question, the match is all square; if A incurred it, B has won the match by two holes. A and B seek a ruling from X, who is not on the Committee. X incorrectly advises A and B that B incurred the penalty and that the match is therefore all square.

A and B accept X's ruling, play extra holes and A wins.

Subsequently, the incident was brought to the attention of the Committee. What should the Committee do?

A.When A and B accepted X's incorrect ruling, they, in effect, settled the doubt themselves and, after A and B began playing extra holes, the Committee was no longer entitled to consider a claim. The match stands as played, with A the winner.

2-5/8.5

Player and Opponent Agree on Incorrect Procedure; Whether Valid Claim May Be Made After Procedure Followed

Q.In a match, a player's ball comes to rest on an artificially-surfaced road. He is uncertain if the road is to be treated as an immovable obstruction or an integral part of the course. He asks his opponent and they agree that the player should treat the road as an immovable obstruction. The player drops the ball in accordance with the procedure under Rule 24-2b and plays it. Prior to playing from the next tee, the opponent discovers that he and the player were wrong as the Committee had introduced a Local Rule declaring the road to be an integral part of the course and, therefore, the player was not entitled to take relief under Rule 24-2b. The player should have incurred a loss of hole penalty under Rule 18 for lifting his ball without authority and failing to replace it. May the opponent claim the hole?

A.No. The claim must not be considered by the Committee because the opponent and the player agreed that the player was entitled to relief under Rule 24-2b. When this agreement was reached, there was no longer a doubtful or disputed point and there was no basis under Rule 2-5 for making a claim.

The players were not in breach of Rule 1-3 as they believed at the time they were proceeding properly.

Related Decisions:

1-3/5 Players Unaware Penalty Incurred.

2-1/1 Players Unable to Resolve Rules Problem Agree to Consider Hole Halved.

2-5/9

Player Agreeing with Opponent That Hole Was Halved Later Realizes He Has Won Hole; Player Then Makes Claim

Q.In a match between A and B, at the 16th hole A scored 6 and B scored 5. When leaving the putting green, B commented to A: "A half?" and A replied: "Yes."

A won the match at the 20th hole and the result was posted. Later, B realized that he had won the 16th hole and, if the mistake had not been made, he would have won the match 1 up.

A admitted that he had made a mistake. B reported the matter to the Committee and claimed the match. Is the claim valid?

A.No. The match stands as played, with A the winner. After the result of the match was posted, the claim by B could have been considered only if A had knowingly given wrong information as to the number of strokes he (A) had taken at the 16th hole – see Rule 2-5.

Related Decision:

9-2/12 Conscious Failure to Correct Opponent's Misunderstanding of State of Match; What Constitutes Wrong Information.

2-5/10

Player Accepting Erroneous Claim Disputes It After Result Announced

Q.In a match, A was in breach of a Rule. Although the penalty for a breach of the Rule in question was only one stroke, B, his opponent, claimed that A lost the hole. A did not dispute the claim. B won the match and the result was posted. Three days later, A protested to the Committee that B had misinformed him with respect to the Rules. What is the ruling?

A.The match stands as played. Under Rule 2-5, no claim may be considered after the result of a match has been announced unless the opponent knowingly gave wrong information. Incorrect information on the Rules is not wrong information. It is up to each player to know the Rules.

Related Decision:

9/1 Incorrect Information on Rules.

2-5/11

Wrong Information Given After Play of Last Hole; Claim Made After Result Announced

Q.In a match, A and B came to the last hole all square. After completion of the hole, A stated that he had scored 9 and B stated that he (B) had scored 8, making B the winner, 1 up. The result was recorded by the Committee.

A few minutes later, a spectator told A that B had scored 9 at the last hole. B reviewed the hole and acknowledged that he had made a mistake and that his actual score was 9. What is the ruling?

A.The match stands as played, with B the winner. Under Rule 2-5 no claim may be considered after the result of a match is announced unless wrong information has been given knowingly.

2-5/12

Imposition of Penalty by Referee After Any Player in Match Has Played from Next Tee

Q.In match play, may a referee penalize a player for a breach of a Rule at a hole if he does not become aware of the breach until someone in the match has played from the next teeing ground?

A.Yes, unless the facts giving rise to the penalty were known to the opponent.

2-5/13

Extra Stroke Taken by Mistake in Handicap Match; Status of Late Claim

Q.Prior to the start of a handicap match, the two players correctly advised one another as to the handicaps to which they were entitled. However, during the match, A, by mistake, took a stroke to which he was not entitled at a certain hole. The error was discovered several holes later. Could B, the opponent, then claim the hole in question?

A.No. A late claim would not be valid unless it was based on facts previously unknown to B and B had been given wrong information by A. In this case A did not give B wrong information as to the number of strokes to which he was entitled during the round, and it was B's responsibility to know the holes at which handicap strokes were to be given (see Note under Rule 6-2). The hole in question stands as played.

Related Decision:

6-2a/3 Handicap Stroke Wrongly Claimed at Hole; Error Discovered Before Hole Completed.

2-5/14

When Match Result "Officially Announced"

Q.Rule 2-5 prohibits a Committee from considering a claim after the result of a match has been "officially announced," except in cases where a player knowingly gave wrong information. When is the result of a match "officially announced"?

A.It is a matter for the Committee to decide when the result of the match has been "officially announced" and it will vary depending on the nature of the competition. When an official scoreboard exists, Rule 2-5 should be interpreted so that the recording of the winner of the match on the official scoreboard is the official announcement of the result of the match. In such cases where a referee has been assigned by the Committee to accompany a match, any announcement of the result of the match by the referee on the final putting green is not the official announcement. However, there may be cases where an official scoreboard is not used, in which case the Committee must clarify when it considers the results "officially announced."

In some cases the official scoreboard will be a prominent structure and in other cases it might be a sheet of paper in the golf shop or locker room. The Committee is generally responsible for recording the winner's name on the scoreboard, but there may be times when the Committee charges the players with this responsibility.

Other Decisions related to Rule 2-5: See "Claims and Disputes" in the Index.

Rules

Decisions

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