Presented by ROLEX Amateur Status Rules & Decisions

Browse the 2012-2015 Rules

6/1

Meaning of "Competes at an Elite Level"

Q. The Definition of "Golf Skill or Reputation" provides that an amateur golfer is considered to have golf skill or reputation if, among other things, he “competes at an elite level.” What is meant by "an elite level?"

A. The phrase "elite level" is purposely broad so as to take into account the great variety of competitions around the world. In general, national championships and other gross stroke play competitions that draw top players from outside the state or county are considered to be of an "elite level." (Revised)

6/2

Definition of Golf Skill for Disabled Amateur Golfer

Q. The Definition of "Golf Skill or Reputation" provides guidance in determining whether, for the purposes of the Rules, a particular amateur golfer has golf skill or reputation. How does this guidance apply in the case of a disabled amateur golfer?

A. From an Amateur Status perspective, a disabled amateur golfer’s golf skill should be determined by a Governing Body based on his ability as a golfer rather than his ability as a disabled golfer. This interpretation has the benefit of being less restrictive in terms of raising sponsorship and publicity for disabled golf. (New)

6/3

Whether Amateur Golfer Retains Golf Skill or Reputation

The Definition of “Golf Skill or Reputation” provides that it is a matter for the Governing Body to decide whether a particular amateur golfer has golf skill or reputation. It is also for the Governing Body to determine whether an amateur golfer is no longer considered to possess golf skill or reputation, or has regained it.

Generally, for golf reputation to be “lost” after golf skill has diminished, a period of five years must have passed since the player (a) had competitive success at a regional or national level or was selected to represent his national, regional, state or county golf union or association; or (b) competed at an elite level. In making this determination, the Governing Body should look at the standard of ability of the player and the level of competition in which the player is currently participating.

An amateur golfer may be considered to possess golf skill or reputation in one state but not in another, as standards of competition and general ability vary from country to country.

An amateur golfer in any doubt should consult his Governing Body. (Revised – Formally 6/2)

6/4

Amateur Golfer Regains Golf Skill or Reputation

Q. A former international amateur golfer begins to compete successfully at state and national levels after having played no competitive golf for over ten years. Is the player considered to be a golfer of golf skill or reputation?

A. Yes. Over time an amateur golfer may be considered no longer to possess golf skill or reputation; however it is possible to regain golf skill or reputation, in which case, the restrictions of Rule 6 may again apply. These restrictions apply irrespective of whether the amateur golfer competes at the same level or at a different level, e.g., becoming a senior international player having previously competed at full international level. (New) 

LENDING NAME OR LIKENESS

6-2/1

Writing Articles to Advertise Own Business

Q. An amateur golfer of golf skill and reputation has been asked to write a series of articles for a magazine concerning his business experiences. It is proposed to publish a photograph of the golfer in the articles. Would this be in breach of Rule 6-2?

A. The writing of such articles is not, in itself, a breach of the Rules. However, it would be contrary to the Rules if an amateur golfer were to use his golf skill or reputation to advertise his business. If an amateur golfer wishes to write such articles, reference to his skill as a golfer must be omitted and any photograph included in the article must not be of him as a golfer. (Revised)

6-2/2

Employee Appears as Golfer in Company Advertisement

Q. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation appears as a golfer in an advertisement for his company. Would this be in breach of Rule 6-2, even if he is not directly compensated for the advertisement?

A. Yes. (Revised)

6-2/3

Company Brochure Containing Reference to Golfing Achievements

Q. A company contains a number of employees who have represented their country as amateur golfers. They have also taken a prominent part in golf administration in their golf unions or associations. Is it permissible to make reference to their achievements in a company brochure?

A. It would be a breach of Rule 6-2 for golfing achievements to be mentioned in connection with the various employees if they remain golfers of golf skill or reputation. However, even in these circumstances, it would not constitute a breach of the Rules to include reference to specific administrative posts held by them. (Revised) 

Related Decision:

6/3  Whether Amateur Golfer Retains Golf Skill or Reputation

6-2/4

Amateur Golfer Promotes Own Company in Magazine

Q. In view of Rule 6-2, is it a breach for an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to advertise or promote his own company in an article which he has written for a magazine?

A. Yes. While it is not a breach of the Rules for a golfer of golf skill or reputation to write an article in a magazine the player would be in breach of Rule 6-2 if he used the article to promote his own company. (Revised)

6-2/5

Amateur Golfer Appears in Advertisement Without Payment or Compensation

Q. May an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation lend his name or likeness as such a golfer in an advertisement if he does not receive any payment or compensation for doing so?

A. No. An amateur golfer appearing in an advertisement is deemed to receive a personal benefit, e.g., enhanced personal profile, for such an appearance in breach of Rule 6-2, unless the Exception to that Rule applies. (Revised)

6-2/6

Magazine Competition

Q. A competition in a golf magazine sponsored by a golf ball manufacturer asks entrants a series of questions on the history of golf. The first prize is worth over $750. Entrants are also asked the following question: “In 15 words say why you think ‘brand X’ is the best ball.” Does such a competition jeopardize the Amateur Status of entrants?

A. As this is not a golf competition, the Rules do not apply in so far as the prizes are concerned. Therefore, there is no objection to receiving a prize in excess of the prize limit (Rule 3-2).

However, an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may be in breach of  Rule 6-2, irrespective of whether he wins a prize or not, if he was quoted stating why he considered a particular brand of ball to be the best. (Revised) 

Related Decisions:

3-2a/5  Prize for Quiz Not Involving Playing Golf 
3-2a/22   Prize of Year’s Dues to Golf Club

6-2/7

Celebrity Advertising Golf Wear

Q. A sportswear company proposes to enter into an agreement with a well-known celebrity who is a keen amateur golfer (Handicap 10), to advertise golf wear in sales brochures. It wishes to use his name in advertisements and pay him to attend company exhibitions. Is this a breach of Rule 6-2?

A. No. The person concerned is not a player of “golf skill or reputation” and, therefore, there is no objection to him advertising sportswear in the manner indicated.

However, if the person were to improve his golf to the extent that he gained golf skill or reputation (see Definition), the provisions of Rule 6 would be applicable to that person. Consequently, any advertising of golf-related products may be considered a breach of Rule 6-2.

6-2/8

Proposal to Invite Leading Golfers to Advertise Golfing Holidays

Q. A national golf union or association has received a request from the Tourist Board of another country inviting seven prominent amateur golfers to visit the country as their guests, using interviews and photographs for the promotion of the tourist trade. Would the Amateur Status of such golfers be jeopardized?

A. Yes. Any golfer of golf skill or reputation would forfeit his Amateur Status for a breach of Rule 6-2 if he were to lend his name or likeness in advertising golfing holidays in this way. However, there would be no breach of the Rules in the case of amateur golfers who are not golfers of golf skill or reputation.

6-2/9

Policy on Issue of Free Equipment to Amateur Golfers

Q. Is it permissible for an amateur golfer to accept free merchandise?

A. Yes. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may accept golf balls, clubs, merchandise, clothing or shoes free of charge from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved – see Note 1 to Rule 6-2. (Revised) 

6-2/10

Guidelines for Issue of Free Equipment to Amateur Golfers

Note 1 to Rule 6-2 permits an amateur golfer to accept free equipment. However, a Governing Body might consider issuing guidelines to manufacturers on the quantity of equipment that may be provided. For example, in any one year, a Governing Body may request that an amateur golfer should not receive in excess of the following:

  1. 24 dozen golf balls.
  2. 1 set of golf clubs.
  3. 1 pair of golf shoes.
  4. 1 set of waterproofs / rain suit.

Note: Any restriction placed on the receipt of golf equipment should only cover the issue of golf equipment free of charge directly to individual amateur golfers and should not cover any issue to golf unions or associations for their teams. (Revised)

6-2/11

Gift of Golf Clubs and Clothing to Encourage Amateur Golfer

Q. A company wishes to assist an amateur golfer of golf skill and reputation in the development of his golf. It is proposed to present him with a set of golf clubs and golf clothing. Is this permissible?

A. Yes, provided the golfer does not advertise the fact that the company has given him the equipment and clothing and there is no reference to the company on the equipment or clothing (other than the standard logo of the company if the company is the manufacturer of the equipment or clothing). (Revised)

6-2/12

Meaning of "Equipment"

Q. What is meant by the term "equipment" in Note 1 to Rule 6-2?

A. Equipment is considered to be anything which may be reasonably purchased from a golf professional’s shop or golf store. (Revised)

6-2/13

Policy on Names on Golf Equipment and Clothing

Q. May a player of golf skill or reputation arrange for his own name to appear on his golf equipment, clothing or shoes, in addition to the name and/or logo of the manufacturer of the equipment, clothing or shoes?

A. Yes. The golf equipment, clothing or shoes must be of the type that is normally available at a retail source and may bear only the name and/or logo of the manufacturer in addition to the name of the player.

Furthermore, it is permissible for a golf bag, umbrella, golf shoes or clothing of a player representing an educational institution to bear, in addition to the manufacturer’s name and/or logo, the player’s name and the name and/or logo of the educational institution.

Note: The player’s name must not appear more than once on each item of equipment or clothing or on each shoe. With regard to golf bags and umbrellas, the name must not exceed a perimeter measurement of 500 mm or 20 inches. With regard to clothing and shoes, the name on each garment or shoe must not exceed a perimeter measurement of 220 mm or 9 inches (see Decision 6-2/15 ). (Revised)

6-2/14

Commercial Logos on Golf Bags

Q. Is it permissible for an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to carry a golf bag with a commercial logo on it?

A. Generally, a golfer of golf skill or reputation would be in breach of the Rules if he used a golf bag with a commercial logo on it (Rule 6-2). However, in the following specific circumstances there would be no breach of the Rules:

  1. The bag was purchased with the logo as an intrinsic part of the bag (e.g., the manufacturer's name); or
  2. The bag was issued to him as a member of a team (see Decision 6-2/15). (Revised)

6-2/15

Commercial Sponsorship of Amateur Golf - Policy on Publicity for Sponsors

In general, an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation is not permitted to have the name and/or a logo of a sponsor on any of his golf equipment or clothing unless the sponsor is the manufacturer of the golf equipment or clothing; with members of a team or squad the situation is somewhat different and is detailed below.

National, regional, state, county golf unions or associations and Clubs sometimes accept commercial sponsorship for international, inter-club or similar important events for teams, squads or individuals. To what extent may commercial sponsors receive publicity, both on and off the course?

1. Golf Bags

(a) Individuals

The name of a commercial sponsor must not appear anywhere on a golf bag (unless the sponsor is also the manufacturer). A golf bag may bear both the player’s name and/or logo of the manufacturer - see Decision 6-2/13.

(b) Teams / Squads

Where a national, regional, state, county or Club team or squad is sponsored, the members of the team or squad may have on their golf bags the name and/or emblem of the team or squad and the name and/or logo of either or both the sponsor and the bag manufacturer. However, the golf bag must be of the type that is normally available at a retail source and must not bear both the player’s name and/or logo of a sponsor and/or manufacturer (other than the bag manufacturer - see Decision 6-2/13).

Note: If the sponsor is not the bag manufacturer, the sponsor’s name and/or logo must not appear more than once on the bag and must not exceed a perimeter measurement of 500 mm or 20 inches.

(c) Prizes

The sponsor's name and/or logo should not appear on a golf bag presented as a prize in a sponsored event unless the sponsor is also the bag manufacturer.

2. Luggage Carried by Teams / Squads

When off the course, e.g., in transit, the name and/or logo of the team or squad sponsor and the name and/or logo of the team or squad may appear on luggage belonging to a team member, e.g., over-bag, hold-all, etc. Such luggage bearing the name and/or logo of the sponsor may bear the name of the player in small letters for identification purposes only (or it may appear on the bag tag). This is not applicable to individual events.

3. Golf Clothing (including golf shoes and head gear)

(a) Individuals

Clothing (including golf shoes and head gear) issued by a commercial sponsor to individuals may only bear the small name and/or logo of the clothing (or golf shoes / head gear) manufacturer and the event concerned (which may or may not include the name and/or logo of the sponsor of the event). Clothing (including golf shoes and head gear) supplied by the manufacturer of that clothing, shoes or head gear may bear both the player’s name and the name and/or logo of the manufacturer, provided the name or logo of any sponsor (including the sponsor of the event) is not displayed.

If the clothing, golf shoes or head gear is issued by a sponsor to individuals in an event, it must be available to all and not just selected players.

Note: The player's name must not appear more than once on each shoe or each garment and must not exceed a perimeter measurement of 220 mm or 9 inches (see Decision 6-2/13).

(b) Teams / Squads

Where a national, regional, state, county or Club team or squad is sponsored, the members of the team or squad may have on their uniforms the name and/or logo of the team or squad and the small name and/or logo of either or both the sponsor and the manufacturer. However, the clothing, golf shoes or head gear must be of the type that is normally available at a retail source and must not bear both the player’s name and the name and/or logo of a sponsor and/or manufacturer (other than the clothing, shoes or head gear manufacturer - see Decision 6-2/13).

Note: A sponsor's name and/or logo must not exceed a perimeter measurement of 220 mm or 9 inches. Each garment may have multiple sponsors’ names and/or logos, provided the total perimeter measurement of all names and/or logos does not exceed 220 mm or 9 inches.

4. Umbrellas

An individual player may carry an umbrella bearing the name of a commercial firm, including that of either a team or an event sponsor or a manufacturer, but such name must not be linked with a particular squad, team or individual, e.g., the name of a commercial firm may appear on the umbrella but the words "The GB and I Team flies/uses ..............................." must not appear. The name of an individual player must not appear on an umbrella bearing the name of a commercial firm unless the firm concerned is the actual manufacturer of the umbrella.

5. Caddie Bibs

Caddie bibs bearing the name and/or logo of a sponsor may not be worn by those caddying for a single team, squad or player; a sponsor’s name and/or logo may appear on bibs made available by the tournament sponsor to the caddies of all the players.

6. Acknowledgements and Publicity

(a) Team, Squad and Individual Events

Commercial sponsors may receive acknowledgements through the press, official programs, etc. and their names or emblems may appear on banners, flags, tee-markers and scoreboards if approved by the organization staging the event.

(b) Team / Squad Events Only

When a team or squad event is commercially sponsored, an acknowledgement to the team sponsor may be published along the following lines
"Thanks to the generosity of ________(commercial sponsors)________ the ________ Golf Union / Association is sending a team to ________ to take part in the World Amateur Team Championship for the Eisenhower Trophy."

7. Exhibition Tents

Sponsors may have a tent etc. at the course displaying their business.

8. Photographs

Photographs may not be published by commercial sponsors with the names of individual team or squad members or competitors for advertising or promotional purposes, but normal coverage by the press or other media cannot be prevented.

9. Hospitality

Sponsors may give hospitality (i.e., meals and drinks, but not accommodation) to all competitors at the course. (Revised) 

6-2/16

Clothing or Equipment Supplied for Team / Squad Used in Individual Event

Q. May an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation wear, during an individual event, a garment bearing a sponsor's logo which was issued to him as a member of a national, regional, state, county or Club team or squad or use a golf bag which bears the name of the team or squad sponsor?

A. Yes. (Revised)

6-2/17

Vehicle with Advertising Slogan Used by Amateur Golfers Representing Team or Squad

Q. (a) May a national, regional, state, county golf union or Club make available a vehicle for use by members of its team or squad during a team or squad event which has been supplied by a commercial sponsor and on which words along the following lines have been prominently printed:
"The ________(national/regional, etc)________ Golf Team Drives ________(name of vehicle)________"?

(b) Is it permissible for such a vehicle to be used by individual players from that country (or equivalent) taking part in individual events in other countries?

(c) When not being used as above, may the vehicle with advertising be used by an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation?

(d) May it be used by a golf administrator from the national, regional, state, county golf union or Club who does not possess golf skill or reputation?

A. (a) Yes. Provided the names of the team or squad members are not displayed.

(b) Yes. Provided the host golf union or association staging the event has approved the entry of the players concerned with expenses paid under Rule 4-2.

(c) No. This would be considered a breach of Rule 6-2.

(d) Yes. (Revised)

6-2/18

Names on Automobile

Q. May the car of an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation bear the golfer's name, or, if sponsored, the sponsor's name, in large letters?

A. No. Neither the name of the golfer nor a sponsor may appear on the car - see Rule 6-2.

However, an employee may use a company car bearing its name provided it is the normal practice of the company to have its name on company cars. (Revised)

6-2/19

Fund Raising to Create Trust Fund for Amateur Golfer

Q. May a Golf Club, group of friends or sponsor organize a competition for the sole purpose of raising money to create a trust fund for an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to either be used towards his expenses as an amateur golfer or to be used when he becomes a professional golfer?

A. No. It would be a breach of Rule 6-2 because he would be using his name and likeness to promote a benefit for himself either at that time or at some time in the future.

However, it would be permissible to hold such an event before a qualifying competition to help the expenses of those who advance, as in such a case the players who will advance to the next stage have not yet been identified (so there is no breach of Rule 6-2 ). (Revised)

Related Decision:

4-2c/3  Competition Expenses of Junior Golfers to Non-Junior Events

6-2/20

Meaning of “Golf Competition or Other Event” and “in the Best Interests of, or Would Contribute to the Development of the Game” in Exception to Rule 6-2

Q. Within the context of the Exception to Rule 6-2, what is meant by the terms “other event” and "in the best interests of, or would contribute to the development of the game?"

A. The term "other event" is purposefully and necessarily broad in order to cover activities such as exhibition matches, talks, organized functions, promotional events and the like.

With regard to determining whether to allow an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to promote a golf competition or other event, it is a matter for the national association to decide whether or not this would be in the best interests of the game or would contribute to its development. The national association should look at each case on its individual merits and the following factors should be taken into consideration:

  • Whether such promotion will generate publicity for golf (particularly amateur golf) that would not otherwise be the case.
  • Whether the promotion will encourage others to take up the sport.
  • Whether the golf competition or event is commercially driven or not.

For example, a Club may wish to promote an amateur competition by distributing posters with the image of one of the amateurs competing in the event. It would be reasonable for the national association to permit such publicity, provided there would be some wider consequential benefit, such as generating additional funds for the junior section of the Club. (Revised)

6-2/20.5

Receipt of Expenses for Allowing Name or Likeness to be Used to Promote Golf Association or Union

Q. A golf association or union requests that an amateur golfer of skill or reputation appear in a promotion for the association or union, as permitted by Exception (a) to Rule 6-2. If the amateur golfer incurs expenses (e.g., travel, lodging, etc.) in connection with the promotion, may he be reimbursed for the expenses?

A. Yes. The amateur golfer may receive reasonable actual expenses in connection with the promotional activity. (New) 

6-2/21

Player Websites

Q. May an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation promote himself through the use of his own website?

A. An amateur golfer may create his own website, publishing through the site information on himself and his achievements as an amateur golfer, which may include his ambitions for a future in professional golf. A player may list personal information such as his home Club, his employer and the equipment he uses. However, such a website may only promote the player himself and must not advertise or promote anything such as a product or business (including his own business), or include a link to any commercial site. 

6-2/22

Commercial Websites

Q. May an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation use his skill or reputation to promote a company’s products in a blog, chat room, etc. on that company’s website?

A. No. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may not use his skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain, directly or indirectly, for allowing his name or likeness to be used to promote the company’s products, either by making comparisons with other products or by encouraging others to purchase the products. However, he may state in such a blog or chat room that he uses the company’s products. (New)

PERSONAL APPEARANCE

6-3/1

Amateur Golfers Offered Free Meals and Remission of Entry Fee

Q. May a Club offer free meals and remission of entry fees to amateur golfers of golf skill and reputation to encourage them to enter a competition and thus increase the status of the event?

A. No. An amateur golfer who accepts such incentives is, because of his golf skill and reputation, indirectly accepting compensation for a personal appearance in a golf competition and is thereby in breach of Rule 6-3.

However, it would not be a breach of the Rules if the incentives (i.e., free meals and remission of entry fee) were offered to all competitors. (Revised) 

Related Decision:

4-1/4  Expenses Organized or Covered by Competition Sponsor  

6-3/2

Amateur Golfer Accepts Expenses as Leader of Golf Tour

Q. May an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation who is not regularly employed by the travel company or organizer accept an expenses-paid trip on a golf tour provided he acts as tour leader?

A. No. Such action would constitute a breach of Rule 6-3 (Revised).

6-3/3

Payment of Fee and Expenses for Television Appearance

Q. Is it permissible for an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to accept a fee and have his expenses covered for an appearance on a television quiz show when he has been chosen because of his golf skill or reputation?

A. It would be a breach of Rule 6-3 for an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation to accept a fee for such an appearance. In the event of it being necessary for the television company to pay such a person a fee under their own regulations the fee must be gifted to charity. It must be paid direct to the charity, no cash transaction can take place between the company and the golfer concerned and the golfer must not benefit directly or indirectly from the charitable donation.

However, the actual expenses incurred by the golfer may be covered as no golf competition or exhibition is involved - see Exception to Rule 6-3. (Revised)

6-3/4

Amateur Golfer Offered Free or Reduced Dues for Representing Club

Q. May a Club offer free or reduced dues to members of golf skill or reputation on the condition that they represent the Club in competitions?

A. No. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation would be in breach of Rule 6-3 for accepting such an offer as he would be considered to be accepting compensation for representing the Club. (Revised) 

Related Decision:

6-6/2   Player of Golf Skill or Reputation Offered Honorary Membership or Free or Reduced Dues

6-3/5

Personal Appearance by Celebrity for Fee

Q. May a celebrity be paid a fee for taking part in a golf competition or exhibition?

A. Yes. Provided the celebrity is being invited for reasons unrelated to his skill or reputation as a golfer, it would not be a breach of the Rules for such a person to accept a fee. (Revised)

BROADCASTING AND WRITING

6-4/1

Writing Article on Fitness and Golf

Q. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation plans to write a series of articles on the relationship between fitness and golf for publication under his name in a golf magazine. He will receive a small payment for expenses, and also some royalties from the sale of the magazine. Is this permissible?

A. Yes, there is no objection to the action proposed provided:

(a) His skill and reputation as a golfer is not advertised;

(b) He is the author of the articles; and

(c) No instruction in golf is given. (Revised)

6-4/2

Royalties for Instructional Publications Written Prior to Reinstatement to Amateur Status

Q. May a golfer who has been reinstated to Amateur Status receive royalties for instructional books or articles written by him before applying for reinstatement?

A. Yes. An amateur golfer may receive royalties for work published prior to the period awaiting reinstatement or being reinstated to Amateur Status. He may also receive royalties for any re-published works, including where the golfer has been asked to write a new foreword, provided no new or additional instructional material is included.

However, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status, or a reinstated amateur golfer, may not receive royalties from any new instructional work written after the commencement of his period awaiting reinstatement. (Revised) 

EDUCATIONAL GRANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

6-5/1

Guidelines for Educational Grants, Scholarships and Bursaries

An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may accept an educational grant, scholarship or bursary, e.g., local council grant or award, government lottery award, or scholarship to attend a college or university.

Educational grants, scholarships or bursaries awarded purely on academic ability do not require the approval of the Governing Body. However, with a golf-related educational grant, scholarship or bursary, where golf skill is a factor in the selection process for such an award, the Governing Body must first approve the terms and conditions of the award prior to the amateur golfer accepting the funding.

An amateur golfer in receipt of an approved golf-related educational grant, scholarship or bursary may use the award to assist in training for and competing in golf competitions. Although not exhaustive, the following may be funded out of the award:

  • educational costs, including tuition fees, books, room and board while attending the college or university;
  • coaching costs, including instructional fees and travel and living expenses (this would also include warm weather coaching);
  • traveling, living costs and caddie fees incurred at golf events;
  • golf equipment (including any clothing worn on a golf course);
  • Golf Club dues;
  • medical treatment (e.g., physical therapy) for conditions specifically affecting the playing of golf; and
  • costs incurred in respect of fitness training

As stated above, the list of permissible uses of the award does not cover every eventuality and there may be other ways in which an amateur golfer may seek to use such funding. An amateur golfer in receipt of an approved golf-related educational grant, scholarship or bursary and those providing such assistance should be aware that the player cannot advertise the source of the award (Rule 6-2).

It is not permissible for golf-related educational grants, scholarships or bursaries to be used to cover the individual’s day-to-day living expenses outside attendance at college or university. (However, reasonable subsistence expenses outside attendance of college or university may be permissible under Rule 4-3.)

If an amateur golfer or the provider of any assistance is in any doubt concerning a proposed use of funding he should contact the Governing Body for guidance. (Revised)

6-5/2

Administration of Golf-Related Educational Grants, Scholarships or Bursaries

The expenses of a scholar or bursar may be paid by the university or college for the permitted purposes detailed in Decision 6-5/1, with the exception of travel and accommodation costs for non-university or non-college team or individual events.

Any funds from a scholarship or bursary to be used to cover expenses incurred at non-university or non-college team or individual events must be lodged with and administered by the scholar’s or bursar’s national, regional, state or county union or association, or with the permission of the Governing Body, paid direct by the university or college. (Revised – Formerly 6-5/4) 

6-5/3

Golfer in Receipt of NCAA Scholarship Accepts Expenses from Other Source

Q. May an amateur golfer in receipt of </span>a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) approved golf scholarship in the USA accept expenses from a different source in addition to his NCAA scholarship?

A. While such actions are not necessarily a breach of the Rules, it may be contrary to NCAA regulations for a player in receipt of a NCAA approved scholarship to accept expenses of any kind from a different source, e.g., a representative of a university in addition to his NCAA scholarship. NCAA scholars, or prospective scholars, are advised to contact the NCAA for further details. (New)

MEMBERSHIP

6-6/1

Honorary Membership for Players Without "Golf Skill or Reputation"

Q. May honorary membership be conferred for a limited period as follows:

(a) To the captain and lady captain in their year of office?

(b) For services rendered, e.g., exceptional involvement in the maintenance of the course or services given free to the Club?

(c) To a member who has been elected to a prestigious office in golf, therefore, bringing honor to the Club?

(d) To the accountant or legal advisor of the Club?

A. Yes. Rule 6-6 applies only to players of “golf skill or reputation” and provided this is not the case, a Club may make whatever arrangements it wishes.

6-6/2

Player of Golf Skill or Reputation Offered Honorary Membership or Free or Reduced Dues

Q. May a player of golf skill or reputation be offered honorary membership of a Club or free or reduced dues?

A. The answer depends on the nature of the offer, i.e., whether the offer is made as an inducement to play for that Club or not.

For example, if the offer is made to a player who has been a member of the Club for a long period of time and has consistently represented the Club or if a player won a major tournament at the Club and the Club wishes to recognize that achievement, in these circumstances, there would be no breach of Rule 6-6 if the player accepted the offer.

However, if an offer was made to a player of golf skill or reputation from another Club for no reason other than as an inducement to play for the Club, acceptance would constitute a breach of Rule 6-6. (Revised) 

Related Decision:

6-3/4  Amateur Golfer Offered Free or Reduced Dues for Representing Club  

6-6/3

Reinstated Amateur Offered Honorary Membership or Free or Reduced Dues by Former Club Employers

Q. May a golfer either awaiting reinstatement or having been reinstated to Amateur Status accept honorary membership or free or reduced dues from the Club at which he used to work as a professional golfer?

A. Yes.

6-6/4

Playing Privileges Given to Members of College or University Golf Team Without Charge

Q. May a Club or course offer playing privileges to members of a college or university team without charge?

A. Yes. The offer may be made for a limited or unlimited period and may include membership at the Club provided the offer is not made as an inducement to represent the Club.

6-6/5

Player Offered Financial Assistance by Club

Q. May a player accept financial assistance, e.g., tournament expenses, from a Club?

A. Yes, provided the offer of financial assistance is not made as an inducement to play for that Club contrary to Rule 6-6. (New) 

Rules

Decisions

Partner Links
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Chevron
   

The USGA and Chevron have committed to using the game of golf to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. This commitment has led to the creation of extensive golf-focused STEM teaching tools, and has resulted in charitable contributions to support golf-related programs through Eagles for Education™

At U.S. Open Championships the Chevron STEM ZONE™ is an interactive experience highlighting the science and math behind the game of golf through a variety of hands-on exhibits and experiments.

The partnership has also produced educational materials such as the Science of Golf video series and a nationally-distributed newspaper insert which are provided to teachers as tools to enhance existing curriculum in schools. These lessons teach the science behind the USGA’s equipment testing, handicapping, and agronomy efforts.

For more interactive experiences featuring golf-focused STEM lessons, visit the partnership homepage.


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Rolex
   

Rolex has been a longtime supporter of the USGA and salutes the sportsmanship and great traditions unique to the game. This support includes the Rules of Golf where Rolex has partnered with the USGA to ensure golfers understand and appreciate the game.

As the official timekeeper of the USGA and its championships, they also provide clocks throughout host sites for spectator convenience.

For more information on Rolex and their celebration of the game, visit the Rolex and Golf homepage.



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IBM
   

IBM has partnered with the USGA to bring the same technology, expertise, and innovation it provides to businesses all over the world to the USGA and golf's national championship.

IBM provides the information technology to develop and host the U.S. Open’s official website, www.usopen.com, as well as the mobile apps and scoring systems for the three U.S. Open championships. These real-time technology solutions provide an enhanced experience for fans following the championship onsite and online.

For more information on IBM and the technology that powers the U.S. Open and businesses worldwide, visit http://www.usopen.com/IBM

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Lexus
   

Lexus is committed to partnering with the USGA to deliver a best-in-class experience for the world’s best golfers by providing a fleet of courtesy luxury vehicles for all USGA Championships.

At each U.S. Open, Women’s Open and Senior Open, Lexus provides spectators with access to unique experiences ranging from the opportunity to have a picture taken with both the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open trophies to autograph signings with legendary Lexus Golf Ambassadors in the Lexus Performance Drive Pavilion.

For more information on Lexus, visit http://www.lexus.com/

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American Express
   

Together, American Express and the USGA have been providing world-class service to golf fans since 2006. By creating interactive U.S. Open experiences both onsite and online, American Express enhances the USGA’s effort to make the game more accessible and enjoyable for fans.

For more information on American Express visit www.americanexpress.com/entertainment


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