Current Projects  

 

Physiology, Genetics, and Breeding
Integrated Turfgrass Management Projects
Environmental Impact Projects
Product Testing
Regional Grants


Physiology, Genetics, and Breeding

The Nobel Prize-winning chemist Robert F. Curl of Rice University spoke for many of his colleagues in science when he proclaimed that the 20th century was "the century of physics and chemistry. But it is clear that the next century will be the century of biology." Seventeen projects are ushering biotechnology into turfgrass species, along with conventional plant breeding improvements bentgrass and bermudagrass. The goal is to reduce water and pesticide use in the long term. The USGA continues to collect and evaluate other promising grass species, such as seashore paspalum and inland saltgrass, which will allow poor quality water to be used in coastal and desert climates. 

 

Project Title

University

Buffalograss Breeding and Genetics

University of Nebraska

Development of a Shade-Tolerant Bermudagrass Cultivars Suitable for Fine Turf Use

Oklahoma State University

Improving Our Understanding of Salinity Tolerance in Perennial Ryegrass Through Transcriptome Analysis  

 Rutgers University

Development of Fine-Textured, Large Patch-Resistant Zoysiagrass Cultivars with Enhanced Cold Hardiness for the Transition Zone

Texas A&M University

Early Physiological Changes Associated in Cold Deacclimation of Annual bluegrass and Creeping bentgrass

University of Massachusetts

Development of seeded zoysiagrass cultivars with improved turf quality and high seed yields

Texas A&M University

Molecular Characterization of Chinch Bug Resistant Buffalograss

University of Nebraska

Characterization and Validation of Molecular Markers Linked to Heat and Drought Tolerance for Marker Assisted Selection of Stress-tolerant Creeping Bentgrass

Rutgers University

Evaluation of Curly Mesquite and Sprucetop Grama for Turfgrass Development  

University of Arizona

Breeding and Evaluation of Kentucky Bluegrass, Tall Fescue, Perennial Ryegrass and Bentgrass for Turf

Rutgers University

Development of Seeded Turf-Type Saltgrass Variety

Colorado State University

Production and Maintenance of Triploid Interspecific Bermudagrass Hybrids for QTL Analysis

University of Georgia

Adaptation and Management of Fine Fescues for Golf Course Fairways  

University of Minnesota

Genetic Improvement of Prairie Junegrass

University of Minnesota

Breeding and Evaluation of Turf Bermudagrass Varieties

Oklahoma State University

Improved Understanding and Testing for Salinity Tolerance in Cool-Season Turfgrasses

Utah State University

Germplasm Improvement of Low-Input Fine Fescues

University of Minnesota

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Integrated Turfgrass Management

The golf course superintendent and staff work diligently to provide the best playing conditions possible; however, proper course management today also requires conserving natural resources and protecting the environment. Thirty-two projects are underway to evaluate reduced pesticide use, increase our understanding of plant disease and insect pests, provide better plant resistance to both pest and climatic stresses, and improve overall management techniques for new and improved turf cultivars.

 

Project Title

University

Efficient Irrigation of Golf Turf in the Cool-Humid New England Region: Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficients

University of Massachusetts

Reducing Watershed Scale Phosphorus Export Through Integrated Management Practices

USDA-Agricultural Research Service

Long Term Nitrogen Fate Research

Michigan State University

Development of Phosphorous Filtering Systems for Environmental Protection

Oklahoma State University

Irrigation Requirements for Salinity Management on Perennial Ryegrass Turf

University of California-Riverside

Foliar Urea-Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Warm-Season Putting Green Turfgrasses Under Salinity Stresses

Clemson University

Development of Best Management Practices for Anthracnose Disease on Annual Bluegrass Putting Green Turf  

Rutgers University

Promotion of Turf Health Through Early Pathogen Detection-Development of a Turf PathoCHIP

Rutgers University

The Development, Application, and Evaluation of a New System for Enhancing the Efficiency of Control Agents for the Management of Sting Nematodes on Golf Course Turf

Clemson University

Use of Silver Nanoparticles for Nematode Control on the Bermudagrass Putting Green

Texas A&M University

Investigations into the Cause and Management of Etiolation on Creeping Bentgrass Putting Greens

North Carolina State University

Management of Bacterial Wilt of Creeping Bentgrass caused by Acidovorax avenae on golf courses in the Eastern United States

University of Rhode Island

Clemson University

Determining the Reproductive Phenology of Emerging Overwintering Annual Bluegrass Weevil Populations for the Optimization of Management Programs  

State University of New York

Biological Control of White Grubs in Turf with Microsclerotial Granules of Metarhizium anisophiae  

USDA/ARS/NCAUR

Integrated Pest Management of Plant-Parasitic Sting Nematodes on Bermudagrass

University of Florida

Infection and Colonization of Bermudagrass by Ophiosphaerella species: the causal agents of spring dead spot of bermudagrass

Oklahoma State University

Occurrence and Identification of an Emerging Bacterial Pathogen of Creeping Bentgrass

Michigan State University

Validation of a Logistic Regression Model for Prediction of Dollar Spot of Amenity Turfgrasses

Oklahoma State University

Optimizing Turfgrass Establishment on Sand-Capped Tees and Fairways

 University of Arkansas

Development of Large Patch Resistant and Cold Hardy Zoysiagrass Cultivars for the Transition Zone

Kansas State University

Development of Large Patch Resistant and Cold Hardy Zoysiagrass Cultivars for the Transition Zone

Purdue University

Large Patch on Zoysiagrass and Spring Dead Spot on Bermudagrass as Affected by Establishment Method and Cultural Practices

University of Arkansas

Novel Enzyme Technology to Alleviate Soil Water Repellency in Turfgrass Situations

University of Georgia

Effect of Glycinebetaine Seed Priming on the Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in Turfgrass

North Dakota State University

Annual Bluegrass Response to Potassium and Calcium Fertilization and Soil pH

Rutgers University

Do Foliar Fertility Products Enhance N Uptake and Turfgrass Performance?

University of Illinois

Developing Management Practices and Prediction Models for Controlling Seedheads on Warm Season Turfgrasses

University of Georgia

Evaluation of Fertilizer Application Strategies for Preventing or Recovering from Large Patch Disease of Zoysiagrass

University of Missouri and Kansas State University

Development of Molecular Diagnostic Assays for Fungicide Resistance in the Dollar Spot Pathogen Sclerotinia homoeocarpa

University of Massachusetts

Do Management Regimes of Organically and Conventionally Managed Golf Course Soils Influence Microbial Communities and Relative Abundance of Important Turf Pathogens?

University of Massachusetts

Advancing Integrated Management of Annual Bluegrass Weevil

Rutgers University

Benefits of Golf Course Naturalized Areas for Biological Control and Pollinator Conservation

University of Kentucky

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 Environmental Impact

There is increasing concern about long-term climate change due to an increase in greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere. What role do the turfgrasses commonly grown on golf courses have on greenhouse gases? These six USGA projects are among the first research studies to evaluate the amount of carbon dioxide stored in the soil each year by golf course turf, as well as the gases emitted by these plants while actively growing and maintained. At this time, the focus is on the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (NO2) that is released to the atmosphere or stored in the soil by actively growing turfgrass.

 

Project Title

University

Water-Use Efficiency and Carbon Sequestration Influenced by Turfgrass Species and Management Practices

University of California, Riverside

Carbon Footprint and Agronomy Practices to Reduce Carbon Footprint of Golf Courses

Colorado State University

Examining Turfgrass Species and Management Regimes for Enhanced Carbon Sequestration

Purdue University

Nitrous Oxide and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Turfgrass: Effects of Irrigation

Kansas State University

Various fertilizer sources and cultivation practices for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and potentially mineralizable nitrogen on Creeping bentgrass and Kentucky bluegrass.

University of Minnesota

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Stands of Cool Season Turfgrass Managed with Organic and Synthetic Nitrogen Fertilize

University of Wisconsin

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 Product Testing

Every year, golf course superintendents are introduced to new products in the marketplace. Without results from objective research, superintendents are asked to make buying decisions based on testimonials from colleagues based on previous experience. Several surveys indicate that golf course superintendents desire side-by-side product evaluations to assist them in making product purchases. The need for this type of information resulted in product testing research. Currently, USGA is funding ten projects that fall into this category.

 

Project Title

University

Evaluation of an Inorganic Soil Amendment to Reduce and Manage Fairy Ring Symptoms in Turfgrass.

Pennsylvania State University

Reducing watershed scale phosphorus export through integrated management practices

USDA-ARS

Plant Growth Regulator and Soil Surfactants’ Effects on Drought and Salinity Stressed Bermudagrass and Seashore Paspalum

New Mexico State University

Product Testing Turf Colorants for Aesthetics and/or as an Alternative to Overseeding

North Carolina State University

Summer Interseeding and Aggressive Post-Seeding Herbicides to Reduce Annual Bluegrass in Fairways

University of Nebraska

Testing a Promising Herbicide to Control Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua) in Creeping Bentgrass Putting Greens

University of Missouri

Developing Weed Management Programs for Creeping Bentgrass Fairways Using Low Environmental Impact Herbicides

University of Tennessee

The Effects of Micro-Blaze Turf Care on Creeping Bentgrass and Bermudagrass Putting Green Quality, Root Growth, and Soil Moisture

Oklahoma State University

Evaluation of New Bermudagrass Cultivars for Golf Course Putting Greens

National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP)

Evaluation of Organic Amendments and Delivery Technologies for Control of Large Patch Disease (Rhizoctonia solani) on Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica) Fairways

University of Missouri, University of Arkansas, and Oklahoma State University

Evaluations of New Turfgrass Fertilizers - Field and Laboratory Studies

Auburn University

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Regional Grants

The USGA Green Section relies on science for answers that will help ensure the long-term success of the golf course management industry. Regional grants were created to quickly answer applied problems to help superintendents meet the challenges of managing golf courses. The regional grants allows directors of all eight USGA Green Section regions to identify applied problems and the appropriate researchers in their regions to solve those problems. Research projects funded under this program most often include cultural aspects of golf course management. Examples include what fungicides work best on a particular disease, or the management of new turfgrass cultivars, renovation techniques, safe and effective use of herbicides, insecticides, or fertilizers. These projects are usually of short duration (1 to 2 years), but can offer golf course superintendents answers to practical, management-oriented challenges that they can put into use quickly.

 

Project Title

University

 

Impact of Sand Size and Topdressing Rate on Surface Firmness and Turf Quality of Velvet Bentgrass

Rutgers

 

Eagle Video Camera Project at The Bear Trace at Harrison Bay

Friends of Harrison Bay

 

Proper Application Rates of Biostimulants on Turfgrass Growth

University of Arizona

 

Are Turfgrasses Capable of Inhibiting Nitrification?

Iowa State University

 

Evaluation of Water Use Rates Among Bermudagrass Cultivars

Oklahoma State University

 

Deficit irrigation programs for water conservation in the management of bermudagrass fairways in Texas

Lone Star GCSA

 

Feasibility of Using Critical Soil Water Content to Determine Cart Traffic During Wet Periods

University of Georgia

 

Reseeding interval following methiozolin (PoaCure) applications

Washington State University

 

Evaluation of Warm- and Cool-Season Turfgrass Species in Indiana

Purdue University

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Partner Links
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The USGA and Chevron have committed to using the game of golf to encourage students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. This commitment has led to the creation of extensive golf-focused STEM teaching tools, and has resulted in charitable contributions to support golf-related programs through Eagles for Education™

At U.S. Open Championships the Chevron STEM ZONE™ is an interactive experience highlighting the science and math behind the game of golf through a variety of hands-on exhibits and experiments.

The partnership has also produced educational materials such as the Science of Golf video series and a nationally-distributed newspaper insert which are provided to teachers as tools to enhance existing curriculum in schools. These lessons teach the science behind the USGA’s equipment testing, handicapping, and agronomy efforts.

For more interactive experiences featuring golf-focused STEM lessons, visit the partnership homepage.

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Rolex has been a longtime supporter of the USGA and salutes the sportsmanship and great traditions unique to the game. This support includes the Rules of Golf where Rolex has partnered with the USGA to ensure golfers understand and appreciate the game.

As the official timekeeper of the USGA and its championships, they also provide clocks throughout host sites for spectator convenience.

For more information on Rolex and their celebration of the game, visit the Rolex and Golf homepage.



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IBM has partnered with the USGA to bring the same technology, expertise, and innovation it provides to businesses all over the world to the USGA and golf's national championship.

IBM provides the information technology to develop and host the U.S. Open’s official website, www.usopen.com, as well as the mobile apps and scoring systems for the three U.S. Open championships. These real-time technology solutions provide an enhanced experience for fans following the championship onsite and online.

For more information on IBM and the technology that powers the U.S. Open and businesses worldwide, visit http://www.usopen.com/IBM

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Lexus is committed to partnering with the USGA to deliver a best-in-class experience for the world’s best golfers by providing a fleet of courtesy luxury vehicles for all USGA Championships.

At each U.S. Open, Women’s Open and Senior Open, Lexus provides spectators with access to unique experiences ranging from the opportunity to have a picture taken with both the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open trophies to autograph signings with legendary Lexus Golf Ambassadors in the Lexus Performance Drive Pavilion.

For more information on Lexus, visit http://www.lexus.com/

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Together, American Express and the USGA have been providing world-class service to golf fans since 2006. By creating interactive U.S. Open experiences both onsite and online, American Express enhances the USGA’s effort to make the game more accessible and enjoyable for fans.

For more information on American Express visit www.americanexpress.com/entertainment


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