Simson Takes Medalist Honors At Senior Amateur


"Bullit” Bob Coleman, a 28-year member of the United States Air Force, wore a special hat in commemoration of the Sept. 11 attacks. (USGA/Steven Gibbons)
By Christina Lance, USGA
September 11, 2011

Manakin-Sabot, Va. – Defending champion Paul Simson, 60, of Raleigh, N.C., carded a two-day total of 5-under-par 139 to take medalist honors at the 2011 USGA Senior Amateur Championship, being conducted at 6,829-yard, par-72 Kinloch Golf Club in Manakin-Sabot, Va.   

First-round leader Mark Bemowski, 65, of Mukwonago, Wis., was one stroke behind at 4-under 140, followed by Rick Woulfe, 61, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., at 3-under 141. 

Simson, who has claimed the stroke-play medal four of the last six years, followed his opening-round 71 with a 4-under 68 on Sunday. In taking medalist honors, he tied William Hyndman III for the most times as medalist at the Senior Amateur. 

Simson opened his round by making 15-foot birdie putts on two of his first three holes. However, consecutive bogeys on holes four and five quickly erased that fast start.  

An up-and-down par out of a greenside bunker on the par-4 sixth brought Simson’s round back to an even keel. 

“I played pretty solid after that,” said Simson, who in 2010 became the first player to win the USGA Senior Amateur, Canadian Men’s Senior and British Seniors Open Amateur Championships in the same season. “I hit all the fairways except for 18 after the seventh hole.”  

Another 15-foot birdie putt on the par-4 eighth hole got Simson back on track. His 35-foot eagle on the par-5 12th put Simson atop the leaderboard, a position that he found very familiar, though not necessarily comfortable.  

“Everyone talks about the medalist jinx, but the defending champion jinx is even longer,” said Simson, with a wry smile.   

His concern is certainly not without merit. The last medalist to take the championship title was John Richardson in 1987, while William C. Campbell was the last player to defend his title when he won in 1979 and 1980.  

Bemowski, who had sole possession of the lead following Saturday’s first round of stroke play, struggled with his short game on Sunday. Four birdies paired with four bogeys made for a relatively disappointing second-place performance. 

“I really hit the ball well today,” said Bemowski, the 2004 Senior Amateur champion. “I just missed a million, billion putts.”   

Woulfe, who started on the 10th hole, opened his round on Sunday morning with consecutive birdies. However, a three-putt double bogey on the par-4 12th, followed by another bogey on the ensuing par-5 13th, quickly erased his early efforts.  

“On 13, my wife could have beat me,” said Woulfe, a five-time Florida State Senior Player of the Year who defeated Tiger Woods en route to victory at the 1992 Dixie Amateur. “Not one good swing and lucky to make bogey.” 

Woulfe carded yet another bogey on the par-4 15th to fall even further down the leaderboard. But a key birdie on the difficult par-4 18th proved to be the turning point of his round. Woulfe converted two birdies over his final four holes to finish 1-under for the round.   

“I’m sitting there at the bottom of the swale on 17, I’m thinking, 39 is not going to be too bad,” said Woulfe. “I got it up and down and then I birdied 18. So that kind of changed my whole thinking.” 

Chip Lutz, 56, of Reading, Pa., and Raymond Thompson, 59, of Drexel Hill, Pa., sit one stroke behind Woulfe at 2-under 142. Lutz, who has already taken the 2011 Canadian Men’s Senior and British Seniors Open Amateur titles, is attempting to join Simson as winner of the three senior titles in the same year.  

George Zahringer, 58, of New York, N.Y., winner of the 2002 U.S. Mid-Amateur, and Ronald Kilby, 56, of McAllen, Texas, round out the players in red numbers at 1-under 143. 

Marvin “Vinny” Giles, 68, of Richmond, Va., a co-designer of Kinloch Golf Club and a two-time USGA champion, shot even-par 72 on his home course to finish at 3-over 147. Other USGA champions to make the cut were George “Buddy” Marucci, 59, of Villanova, Pa., at 4-over 148, and Stanford Lee, 59, of Heber Springs, Ark., at 5-over 149. 

A playoff will be conducted at 8:30 a.m. on Monday to finalize the match-play bracket, with 2005 Senior Amateur champion Mike Rice among the nine players competing for the final eight berths in match play. Sixty-five players sit at 7-over 151 or better, making this year’s cut the lowest in Senior Amateur history. 

Notable players to miss the cut were Senior Amateur champions Mike Bell (2006), Greg Reynolds (2002) and Kemp Richardson (2001 and 2003) as well as 1975 U.S. Amateur champion and past USGA President Fred Ridley. 

In commemoration of today’s 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, the traditional USGA hole flags on Nos. nine and 11 were replaced with American flags.  

After Monday’s first round of match play, the final five rounds of match play will be conducted over the following three days, with the championship scheduled to conclude with an 18-hole final on Thursday. 

The USGA Senior Amateur, open to golfers 55 and older, is one of 13 national championships conducted annually by the USGA, 10 of which are strictly for amateurs. 

 

Manakin-Sabot, Va. – Results from Sunday’s second round of stroke-play qualifying at the 2011 USGA Senior Amateur Championship, played at 6,821-yard, par-72 Kinloch Golf Club. (* - in a playoff at 8:30 a.m. Monday) 

 

Paul Simson, Raleigh, N.C. - 71-68—139 

Mark Bemowski, Mukwonago, Wis. - 68-72—140 

Rick Woulfe, Ft Lauderdale, Fla. - 70-71—141 

Chip Lutz, Reading, Pa. - 70-72—142 

Raymond Thompson, Drexel Hill, Pa. - 70-72—142 

George Zahringer, New York, N.Y. - 73-70—143 

Ronald Kilby, McAllen, Texas - 73-70—143 

Andrew Congdon, Great Barrington, Mass. - 71-73—144 

Philip Pleat, Nashua, N.H. - 74-70—144 

David Anthony, Jacksonville, Fla. - 71-74—145 

James Pearson, Charlotte, N.C. - 75-70—145 

Gary Brewster, New Orleans, La. - 72-73—145 

James Grainger, Charlotte, N.C. - 76-70—146 

Patrick Tallent, Vienna, Va. - 75-71—146 

Bill Leonard, Kennesaw, Ga. - 73-73—146 

Joe Viechnicki, Bethlehem, Pa. - 72-74—146 

Emile Vaughan, Pike Road, Ala. - 72-74—146 

Bill Zylstra, Dearborn Heights, Mich. - 71-75—146 

Tom Brandes, Bellevue, Wash. - 73-73—146 

Pat O'Donnell, Happy Valley, Ore. - 72-74—146 

Jeff Burda, Modesto, Calif. - 71-76—147 

Tony Green, Kingsport, Tenn. - 73-74—147 

Paul Murphy, Arlington, Mass. - 70-77—147 

Jack Vardaman, Washington, D.C. - 73-74—147 

Pat Vincelli, Rosemount, Minn. - 74-73—147 

Vinny Giles, Richmond, Va. - 75-72—147 

Martin West, Rockville, Md. - 73-75—148 

Buddy Marucci, Villanova, Pa. - 73-75—148 

Kent Frandsen, Lebanon, Ind. - 72-76—148 

Mike Jackson, Canada - 74-74—148 

Bob Kain, Hunting Valley, Ohio - 74-74—148 

Sam Till Jr., Fort Wayne, Ind. - 73-75—148 

Joe Sommers, Stamford, Conn. - 75-73—148 

Tim Miller, Kokomo, Ind. - 72-76—148 

Steve Poulson, Draper, Utah - 73-75—148 

Jay Sessa, Garden City, N.Y. - 73-76—149 

Richard Marlowe, Canfield, Ohio - 77-72—149 

Stanford Lee, Heber Springs, Ark. - 77-72—149 

Robert Shelton, Lafayette, La. - 75-74—149 

Bill Palmer, Bluffton, S.C. - 75-74—149 

Dave Ryan, Taylorville, Ill. - 74-75—149 

John Sajevic, Fremont, Neb. - 74-75—149 

Eddie Lyons, Shreveport, La. - 77-72—149 

Alan Fadel, Toledo, Ohio - 76-73—149 

Chris Maletis, Portland, Ore. - 74-76—150 

Louis Lee, Heber Springs, Ark. - 76-74—150 

John Grace, Fort Worth, Texas - 74-76—150 

Duke Delcher, Bluffton, S.C. - 74-76—150 

Ronald Carpenter, Creedmoor, N.C. - 77-73—150 

Buzz Fly, Memphis, Tenn. - 73-77—150 

Jack Kearney, Peachtree City, Ga. - 77-73—150 

Hunter Nelson, Houston, Texas - 73-77—150 

Michael Booker, The Woodlands, Texas - 77-73—150 

Peter Metzler, Killington, Vt. - 71-79—150 

Michael Weiner, Kiawah Island, S.C. - 74-76—150 

Neil Spitalny, Chattanooga, Tenn. - 75-75—150 

Ken Larney, Orland Park, Ill. - 79-72—151* 

Steve Whittaker, Becker, Minn. - 76-75—151* 

Bobby Barben, Avon Park, Fla. - 76-75—151* 

Mike Rice, Houston, Texas - 73-78—151* 

William Thomas Doughtie, Amarillo, Texas - 76-75—151* 

Armen Dirtadian, Tucson, Ariz. - 76-75—151* 

Ian Harris, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. - 75-76—151* 

Casey Boyns, Pacific Grove, Calif. - 77-74—151* 

Rich Tolly, Laguna Hills, Calif. - 74-77—151* 

 

Failed to Qualify 

Curtis Langille, Lake Geneva, Wis. - 81-71—152 

Dan Smith, Fairfield, Ohio - 79-73—152 

Joseph Corsi, Greensburg, Pa. - 72-80—152 

Brian Sparrow, Chagrin Falls, Ohio - 75-77—152 

Frank Ford III, Charleston, S.C. - 77-76—153 

Dan Bieber, Alamo, Calif. - 76-77—153 

Carl Ho, Honolulu, Hawaii - 78-75—153 

J.W. Entsminger, Lexington, Va. - 75-78—153 

Robert Polk, Parker, Colo. - 77-76—153 

Tim Kelley, Ashland, Va. - 76-77—153 

Douglas Pool, Las Vegas, Nev. - 78-75—153 

Tom Preston, Mesa, Ariz. - 77-77—154 

Marshall Uchida, Honolulu, Hawaii - 80-74—154 

John Pallin, Kenosha, Wis. - 79-75—154 

Michael Bell, Indianapolis, Ind. - 75-79—154 

Jim Graham, Rye, N.Y. - 78-76—154 

Doug Stroup, Hudson, Ohio - 77-77—154 

Jon Empanger, Chaska, Minn. - 81-73—154 

Kemp Richardson, Laguna Niguel, Calif. - 80-74—154 

Jerry Michals, Carlsbad, Calif. - 74-80—154 

Don Misheff, Silver Lake, Ohio - 79-75—154 

Rick Lutz, Oklahoma City, Okla. - 78-76—154 

Frank Travetto, Greensboro, Ga. - 76-78—154 

James Curell, Boone, Iowa - 80-75—155 

Chip Howell, Anniston, Ala. - 81-74—155 

Carter Fasick, Milford, Mass. - 77-78—155 

J. Michael Fetter, East Amherst, N.Y. - 79-76—155 

David Cannon, Salt Lake City, Utah - 76-79—155 

Rich Gleghorn, Springfield, Mo. - 76-79—155 

Jim Wise, Columbia, S.C. - 79-76—155 

John Davis, Acworth, Ga. - 78-77—155 

Fred Ridley, Tampa, Fla. - 72-83—155 

Chip Travis, Hinsdale, Ill. - 77-78—155 

James Saivar, San Diego, Calif. - 73-82—155 

Craig Scheibert, Carmel, Ind. - 80-76—156 

Greg Reynolds, Grand Blanc, Mich. - 78-78—156 

David Nelson, Reno, Nev. - 77-79—156 

Steve Isaacs, Richmond, Va. - 78-78—156 

J.P. Leigh, Suffolk, Va. - 74-82—156 

James Myers, Oceanside, Calif. - 78-78—156 

J. Robert Gengras, Avon, Conn. - 77-79—156 

Craig Collins, Enid, Okla. - 79-78—157 

Robert Trittler, Wentzville, Mo. - 76-81—157 

Mike Raymond, Jackson, Mich. - 78-79—157 

Roger Self, Canada - 83-74—157 

Bob Coleman, The Villages, Fla. - 79-78—157 

John Enright, Montara, Calif. - 78-79—157 

Todd Lusk, Baton Rouge, La. - 78-79—157 

Dennis Long, Shelbyville, Ky. - 81-77—158 

Brian Harris, Rochester, N.Y. - 76-82—158 

Greg Osborne, Lititz, Pa. - 79-79—158 

Gary Van Sickle, Wexford, Pa. - 77-81—158 

Greg Lynn, Edmond, Okla. - 77-81—158 

John O'Neill, Carmel, Calif. - 82-76—158 

Steve Fay, Arlington, Va. - 77-82—159 

Don Detweiler, Raleigh, N.C. - 78-81—159 

Evan Long, Charlotte, N.C. - 75-84—159 

Bob Rowland, Danville, Calif. - 84-75—159 

Rick George, Greenwood Village, Colo. - 80-79—159 

Bruce Meyer, El Paso, Texas - 81-79—160 

Mike Owsik, Bryn Mawr, Pa. - 83-78—161 

Jonathan Verity, Beaufort, S.C. - 81-80—161 

Jody Vasquez, Aledo, Texas - 79-82—161 

Keith Keister, Orlando, Fla. - 80-81—161 

Allen Pattee, Manchester, N.H. - 79-83—162 

Bill Henry, Cranford, N.J. - 79-83—162 

Fred Peel, Chipley, Fla. - 81-81—162 

Calvin Stacey, Billings, Mont. - 84-79—163 

Richard Hageman, Garden Ridge, Texas - 82-81—163 

Dan Meyers, Oro Valley, Ariz. - 78-85—163 

Bob Harrington, Portland, Ore. - 80-83—163 

Peter Snyder, Encinitas, Calif. - 81-84—165 

Cy Kilgore, Beverly, Mass. - 76-89—165 

Thomas Hofman, Santa Clarita, Calif. - 83-82—165 

Michael Moore, Spanaway, Wash. - 83-83—166 

Todd Baumgartner, Bismarck, N.D. - 79-87—166 

David Merrell, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. - 80-86—166 

Greg Stirman, Sugar Land, Texas - 82-85—167 

Mike Dixon, Trinidad, Colo. - 80-87—167 

Bill Huckin, Dallas, Texas - 88-80—168 

Steve Gasper, Birmingham, Mich. - 88-80—168 

William Creason, Louisville, Ky. - 85-85—170 

Robert Straub, Courtland, Ala. - 87-87—174 

Bob Sherman, Santa Fe, N.M. - 82-92—174 

Gary Murdoch, Juneau, Alaska - 87-88—175 

Wayne Monroe, Bremen, Ga. - 92-93—185 

Tim Carlton, Cypress, Texas - 72-DQ—DQ 

Dave Nichols, Roswell, Ga. - 79-DQ—DQ 

James Wetherbee, Galesburg, Ill. - 79-WD—WD 

Peach Reynolds, Austin, Texas - 77-DQ—DQ 

Gary Menzel, Milwaukee, Wis. - 78-WD—WD 

 

Manakin-Sabot, Va. – Pairings for Monday’s first round of match play at the 2011 USGA Senior Amateur Championship, played at 6,821-yard, par-72 Kinloch Golf Club.  

 

Upper Bracket 

11:30 a.m.: Paul Simson, Raleigh, N.C. (139) vs. To Be Determined   

9:30 a.m.: Sam Till Jr., Fort Wayne, Ind. (148) vs. Joe Sommers, Stamford, Conn. (148) 

9:38 a.m.: Joe Viechnicki, Bethlehem, Pa. (146) vs. Ronald Carpenter, Creedmoor, N.C. (150) 

9:46 a.m.: Emile Vaughan, Pike Road, Ala. (146) vs. Duke Delcher, Bluffton, S.C. (150) 

11:06 a.m.: Andrew Congdon, Great Barrington, Mass. (144) vs. To Be Determined   

9:54 a.m.: Pat Vincelli, Rosemount, Minn. (147) vs. Bill Palmer, Bluffton, S.C. (149) 

10:02 a.m.: Philip Pleat, Nashua, N.H. (144) vs. Neil Spitalny, Chattanooga, Tenn. (150) 

10:10 a.m.: Jack Vardaman, Washington, D.C. (147) vs. Dave Ryan, Taylorville, Ill. (149) 

11:22 a.m.: Chip Lutz, Reading, Pa. (142) vs. To Be Determined   

10:18 a.m.: Kent Frandsen, Lebanon, Ind. (148) vs. Jay Sessa, Garden City, N.Y. (149) 

10:26 a.m.: James Grainger, Charlotte, N.C. (146) vs. Hunter Nelson, Houston, Texas (150) 

10:34 a.m.: Pat O'Donnell, Happy Valley, Ore. (146) vs. Chris Maletis, Portland, Ore. (150) 

11:14 a.m.: Raymond Thompson, Drexel Hill, Pa. (142) vs. To Be Determined   

10:42 a.m.: Buddy Marucci, Villanova, Pa. (148) vs. Richard Marlowe, Canfield, Ohio (149) 

10:50 a.m.: Gary Brewster, New Orleans, La. (145) vs. Michael Booker, The Woodlands, Texas (150) 

10:58 a.m.: Jeff Burda, Modesto, Calif. (147) vs. Alan Fadel, Toledo, Ohio (149) 

 

Lower Bracket 

11:38 a.m.: Mark Bemowski, Mukwonago, Wis. (140) vs. To Be Determined   

11:46 a.m.: Bob Kain, Hunting Valley, Ohio (148) vs. Tim Miller, Kokomo, Ind. (148) 

11:54 a.m.: Bill Leonard, Kennesaw, Ga. (146) vs. Buzz Fly, Memphis, Tenn. (150) 

12:02 p.m.: Bill Zylstra, Dearborn Heights, Mich. (146) vs. John Grace, Fort Worth, Texas (150) 

12:10 p.m.: Ronald Kilby, McAllen, Texas (143) vs. To Be Determined   

12:18 p.m.: Vinny Giles, Richmond, Va. (147) vs. Robert Shelton, Lafayette, La. (149) 

12:26 p.m.: David Anthony, Jacksonville, Fla. (145) vs. Michael Weiner, Kiawah Island, S.C. (150) 

12:34 p.m.: Paul Murphy, Arlington, Mass. (147) vs. John Sajevic, Fremont, Neb. (149) 

12:42 p.m.: Rick Woulfe, Ft Lauderdale, Fla. (141) vs. To Be Determined   

12:50 p.m.: Mike Jackson, Canada (148) vs. Steve Poulson, Draper, Utah (148) 

12:58 p.m.: Patrick Tallent, Vienna, Va. (146) vs. Jack Kearney, Peachtree City, Ga. (150) 

1:06 p.m.: Tom Brandes, Bellevue, Wash. (146) vs. Louis Lee, Heber Springs, Ark. (150) 

1:14 p.m.: George Zahringer, New York, N.Y. (143) vs. To Be Determined   

1:22 p.m.: Martin West, Rockville, Md. (148) vs. Stanford Lee, Heber Springs, Ark. (149) 

1:30 p.m.: James Pearson, Charlotte, N.C. (145) vs. Peter Metzler, Killington, Vt. (150) 

1:38 p.m.: Tony Green, Kingsport, Tenn. (147) vs. Eddie Lyons, Shreveport, La. (149) 

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